Jane McAdam Freud

Jane McAdam Freud
Jane McAdam Freud
Jane McAdam Freud
Female
United Kingdom
1958
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Jane McAdam Freud is a multidisciplinary artist, internationally praised for her sculptures, but she expresses herself through digital art, video art and installations, too. She is the daughter of Lucian Freud and Katherine McAdam and great-granddaughter of Sigmund Freud. The family heritage influences are indisputable, and this brilliant artist proudly preserves and enriches her family legacy. Her work can be read like a book and expounded like a psychoanalysis session. Everything is open to interpretation, from the shapes of the sculptures to the material she uses. Although her project explores the process of intuition, some of her content includes family bonds, mother-daughter relationships, love, creation, and self-exploration.

 

Jane McAdam Freud with her 2010 sculpture  ´Stone Speak.' (detail) (www.wsj.com)

Jane McAdam Freud with her 2010 sculpture Stone Speak, photo via www.wsj.com


 

Psychological Background

A Born Londoner, Jane started her education there and got her first degree from Central School of Art and her masters from the Royal College of Art. She was then awarded the British Art Medal Scholarship in Rome where she studied sculpture for three years, on her extended Scholarship. Her commitment to the art world is tremendous and she only continues to progress. Jane believes that what we do and where we come from is what makes us what we are. Everything about her sculpture is more than what it seems as her concepts are informed by psychological imperatives. Her sculptures are biographical, but they are also archetypes that reveal aspects of our individual personality.

 

McAdam Freud first felt the power of catharsis while making the large head sculpture of her father

Jane McAdam Freud - sculpture of her late father Lucian  Freud (detail) (www.pinterest.com)

Jane McAdam Freud – sculpture of her late father Lucian Freud, photo via www.pinterest.com


 

Family Heritage

Jane had an artistic approach to everything from early childhood. Coming from a family of creative intellectuals she could not have gone in a different direction. Although she struggled for a while to accept her family heritage, Jane eventually found herself embracing her legacy. Art is more than therapeutic for her but she first felt the power of catharsis while making the large head sculpture of her father. Using heavy materials she made a large, heavy, stable sculpture in order to preserve her father’s life. That was her way of coping with his death. McAdam made him inanimate from one side – his eyes are closed and mouth shut. From the other side, his eyes are open, his mouth looking as if he is about to speak. He vanished from the material world but is ever present in her life. The same goes for any father figure.

 

Wired sculptures metaphorically indicate the process of shaping one’s relations with others

Jane McAdam Freud - Poetic Encounter, 2015. Courtesy Gazelli Art House and the artist, phto credits www.arsty.net

Jane McAdam Freud – Poetic Encounter, 2015, photo courtesy Gazelli Art House and the artist


 

Open Wire Frames

Jane McAdam Freud made a switch to a lighter composition and material for her Mother Mould project, but the topic she explored stayed as difficult as topics can get. While examining the cultural phenomena of motherhood, her work spans concepts of childbirth to the complex relationships we have with ‘the mother’ both as a personal and a cultural figure. Wired sculptures metaphorically indicate the process of shaping one’s relations with others. The wire has to be folded and molded, shaped and fixed and it all requires strength, patience, and dedication. Wire mesh with its unruly character challenges the creator to be resilient in maintaining a vision. The resulting wire sculpture is sheer, but there is nothing transparent about the meaning of Jane’s art. It is buried deep in the soul, layered with psychological symbols and expressed with great thought and feeling.

She is represented by Gazelli Art House, Mayfair, London.

Jane McAdam Freud lives and works in London.

Featured image: Jane McAdam Freud, photo credits www.carechoices.co.uk

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