Ben Tricklebank Examines the Reaction and Distortion as the Viewer Approaches his Installation

Art ExhibitionsNatalie P

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  • Work by Ben Tricklebank, featured in Endec, 2016 © Ben Tricklebank Courtesy Gazelli Art House (detail)

The British-born, Los-Angeles based artist and filmmaker Ben Tricklebank will be exhibiting as a solo artist in the UK for the first time. The following exhibition at Gazelli Art House will embody the artist’s main interests and creative endeavors, demonstrating the interdisciplinary nature and the interactive character of his installations. Most of his projects are based on the visual dialogues between the exhibits and the audience, as well as between the elements of the exhibited material internally, with each other. New forms of cross-genre expression are primarily sought though the erasure of autonomy, which makes it possible for each element to be rendered as something else or something more than it originally stands for.

 

Work by Ben Tricklebank, featured in Endec, 2016 © Ben Tricklebank Courtesy Gazelli Art House 1

Work by Ben Tricklebank, featured in Endec, 2016 © Ben Tricklebank Courtesy Gazelli Art House


 

White Liquid Canvas

Bearing this in mind, Tricklebank experiments with the notion of a liquid canvas, which will be set within the gallery’s ground floor. The “canvas” is actually a reflective surface of a pool, filled with a white, milky substance. The installation is equipped with sensors that analyze motion, which makes the water respond to the action (or inaction) of the viewer. As the spectator comes closer to the pool, the ripples intensify, which also makes the lights reveal the viewer’s distorted silhouette beneath this watery plane.

 

Work by Ben Tricklebank, featured in Endec, 2016 © Ben Tricklebank Courtesy Gazelli Art House 2

Work by Ben Tricklebank, featured in Endec, 2016 © Ben Tricklebank Courtesy Gazelli Art House


 

Human Relationship with Technology

The installation is accompanied by a new series of photographs, which feature a woman covered in a milky-white fluid alike. It seems like the photographs are taken with a similar sentiment, reflecting on the process of action and reaction, demonstrated by the way in which this female figure corresponds to the fluid matter that covers it. It is not certain whether the woman is being gently embraced, or choked by the white substance. Throughout the entire exhibition, this substance is used as a metaphor, since the abstract white fluid is aimed to represent the ever-progressive nature of technology, which preoccupies and enfolds us all. The artist wonders if it is possible to maintain our own freedom and independence, having such close relationship with technology today.

 

Ben Tricklebank exhibition

Work by Ben Tricklebank, featured in Endec, 2016 © Ben Tricklebank Courtesy Gazelli Art House


 

Ben Tricklebank’s Endec, followed by a Group Exhibition

Endec is how the show is titled, and  for those who do not now, endec is a device, which acts as both an encoder and a decoder on a signal or data stream, either with the same or separate circuitry or algorithm. It is the first instalment of a two-part exhibition, which is to be accompanied by a short, experimental film, deriving inspiration from the installation. Endec will be on view from May 13th through June 25th 2016, at Gazelli Art House in London. Private view is scheduled for May 12th, from 6 to 8 PM.
 
Coinciding with  Tricklebank’s solo exhibition, there will be a group show on the first floor of the gallery, dealing with the subjects of surveillance and and concepts of control. The exhibitions are thematically similar, both regarding technological matter. The full list of exhibiting artists will be announced.
 

Featured image: Work by Ben Tricklebank, featured in Endec, 2016 © Ben Tricklebank Courtesy Gazelli Art House (detail).
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