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Angela Bulloch and Maria Zerres Present Entropic Visions at Sharjah Art Museum

  • Angela Bulloch, Maria Zerres
March 12, 2016
Passionate about art, frequent visitor of exhibitions, Widewalls photography specialist.

In many spheres of science, such as physics, thermodynamics, probability theory, sociology and information technology, the term “entropy” is used to describe a movement towards chaos, to measure disorder. As such an intriguing phenomenon, entropy has also found its way to the arts, emerging in the late 1960s to refer to installations dealing with the entropic state, order and disorder, the way they exist independently, but also how they influence each other. Among the artists who were fascinated by this are Canadian artist Angela Bulloch and German painter Maria Zerres, both of whom will have solo exhibitions at UAE’s Sharjah Art Museum, under one title: Considering Dynamics and the Forms of Chaos.

Angela Bulloch, Maria Zerres contact video biography wall sound 1961 auction privacy home
Angela Bulloch – Horizontal Technicolour, 2002/2016, detail. Courtesy Esther Schipper, Berlin

Entropy of Angela Bulloch

Born in Canada, living in Berlin and belong to the group of Young British Artists, Angela Bulloch is someone whose artistic practice spans many media, from video and installation to sculpture and painting. In her work, she explores the ways in which we, as a society, construct and interpret various types of information, coming from sources like art, film, literature and music. Angela Bulloch’s art employs elements of industrial design, and even architecture, and it is quite scientific too: her famous pixel boxes sculptural installations, in the making since the early 2000s, were created in collaboration with engineers, and represent infinitely programmed light boxes with three fluorescent tubes, capable of creating all 16 million colors of a standard computer screen. For the artist, it’s all about codes that recreate life and art, manifested through patterns, systems, rules and distinct aesthetics.

Angela Bulloch, Maria Zerres contact 1961 auction privacy home video biography wall sound
Maria Zerres – Reading Woman, 1993. Courtesy: Galerie Brigitte Schenk, Cologne

The Abstractions and Figurations of Maria Zerres

Floating in the limbo between the real and the surreal, German artist Maria Zerres creates paintings that tackle two disparate worlds and forms of expressions. While her objects are familiar and somewhat realistic, her way of painting them is highly expressive, eventually leading her art into an abstract one. Through the use of bold, gestural brushstrokes and colors, she attaches personal emotions to imagery like those of the animals or portraits of humans, evoking both simplicity and the complexity of expression. Maria Zerres plays with the surface of her canvases, by emphasising not painted and over-painted areas as the results of improvisation.

Angela Bulloch, Maria Zerres contact 1961 auction privacy home video biography wall sound
Left: Maria Zerres – Deer, 1995. Courtesy: Galerie Brigitte Schenk, Cologne / Right: Angela Bulloch – Stack of Five, 2015. Courtesy Esther Schipper, Berlin

Considering Dynamics and the Forms of Chaos at Sharjah Art Museum

Through entirely different approaches, both Angela Bulloch and Maria Zerres tackle the notions of entropy and the movement towards chaos, one through the use of technology and the other using a highly expressive form of painting. Considering Dynamics and the Forms of Chaos, two parallel solo exhibitions by Angela Bulloch and Maria Zerres, will be on view at Sharjah Art Museum in Sharjah, United Arab Emirates, from March 9th through May 31st, 2016. The opening reception is set for March 9th, from 7pm to 9pm. The shows are organized under the patronage of His Highness Dr. Sheikh Sultan bin Mohammed Al Qasimi and with the kind support of Her Excellency Sheikha Hoor Al Qasimi, Sharjah, in cooperation with Galerie Brigitte Schenk, Cologne and Esther Schipper, Berlin.

All images courtesy of Sharjah Art Museum.