Dean Home - An afternoon in the garden (detail) - Photo Credits In The Real World

Dean Home

Australia 1961

Painting

Dean Home
Dean Home
Male
Australia
1961
March 16, 2016
Andreja Velimirović is a passionate content writer with a knack for art and old movies. Majoring in art history, he is an expert on avant-garde modern movements and medieval church fresco decorations. Feel free to contact him via his Linkedin profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andreja-velimirovi%C4%87-74068a68/

Painters have scarcely used still life for different reasons. Traditionally, its roots can be located in art schools, where young painters would practice their sense of proportion, lighting and perspective by drawing a few objects placed on a table. Long considered to be nothing more than a means to an end, still life got the reputation it deserved during the time of the great Caravaggio who used to paint these motifs with the same vigour as the rest of his work. Caravaggio proved that there is much more to still life than a mere practice routine. Today, many artists still draw fruit at the start of their career, but there are a few of them who dedicated their entire creative careers to painting still life. Dean Home is a name that you can not ignore when it comes to the contemporary art of still life.

Dean Home - The overgrown path, 2015 - Photo Credits Arthouse Gallery
Dean Home – The overgrown path, 2015 – Photo Credits Arthouse Gallery

Why Still Life?

It’s not easy to give meaning to still life compositions. Basically, you’ve got a few inanimate objects that are related to each other through same lighting and/or color. It’s obvious what it is, so trying to dig deeper may seem like a futile attempt at something rather unnecessary. In Home’s case, this couldn’t be further from the truth. Dean’s art is well established theoretically and he loves to speak about meanings behind his still life compositions. He connects them to sex, human nature and mortality – motifs that attracted Home from his early painting days when he explored the worlds of different mythologies. His earlier work usually revolved around Charon, a cursed ferryman who transported souls of the damned over the river Stix. Though far away from still life, these paintings allow us to see the beginnings of Home’s experimentation with light and dark – as well as his interest in life and death. After studying Renesaince art for a while, Dean finally turned towards his first still life projects during the year of 2001. He claims that the reason for this radical change of subject in his work was inspired by a Chinese bowl from the Kangxi period. At that time – even as fascinated as he was – there was no way to predict that this bowl would influence him into making his own recognizable style of painting.

Home’s paintings are incredibly colorful

Dean Home - We see a path - Photo Credits Metro Gallery
Dean Home – We see a path – Photo Credits Metro Gallery

Becoming Perfect

Over time, Dean slowly and relentlessly perfected his style. He was surprised how much slight variations were able to change the outlook of the entire painting. Home continued down that road and soon became a master of composition. With that and his incredible command of color, Dean’s artwork became a complete symphony, with each scene dramatically composed and theatrically lit, burst with rich coloration. The backgrounds also have an important role to play – unlike traditional still life images where the background setting was irrelevant, in Home’s compositions we often find very detailed objects put behind the vegetation. That leads us to the next feature in Home’s artwork, the sheer number of detail he is able to add to one canvas. His obsessive attention to the smallest details requires him to draw over 200 sketches for a single painting! Ironically, he has admitted that improvisation is not something he shies away from and that he often adds new elements after already starting to paint. This master colourist held many solo and group exhibitions in his thirty-year long career and – judging by his latest work – he will continue to display his art for years to come.

Dean puts a lot of details in his artwork

Dean Home - Wellspring, 2015 - Photo Credits Gallery One
Dean Home – Wellspring, 2015 – Photo Credits Gallery One

Dean Home’s Greatness

Dean Home’s gorgeous paintings are a real breath of fresh air in the world where traditional arts are slowly losing the race with contemporary ideas of creativity. Still life he depicts is almost perfect in every way, from composition and coloring to the amount of detail. With enigmatic narratives and a strong sense of momento mori in his work, Dean’s paintings offer a lot more than just a beautiful sight to behold. With his lighting only rivaled by the greats of art history, Home has showed he possesses an enormous talent for creating “dead” images that are, in contrast, full of life. His artwork is a must-see for any art fan, but especially if you love older techniques and ways of painting.

The artist is represented by Cat Street Gallery in Hong Kong, China.
Featured Image: Dean Home – An afternoon in the garden (detail) – Photo Credits In The Real World
All images used for illustrative purposes only.

YearExhibition TitleGallery/MuseumSolo/Group
2014Dean Home Metro Gallery, Melbournesolo
2014Unknown Geelong Contemporary Art Prize, Geelong Gallery, Finalistgroup
2013Dean Home Metro Gallery, Melbournesolo
2013Dean Home Arthouse Galleries, Sydneysolo
2013Unknown Eutick Memorial Still Life Award, Coffs Harbour Regional Gallery, Finalistgroup
2012Dean Home Paintbox Gallery, Canberrasolo
2012Unknown Eutick Memorial Still Life Award, Coffs Harbour Regional Gallery, Finalistgroup
2012Unknown Australian Still Life -not just another bowl of flowers, Goulburn Regional Gallerygroup
2011Dean Home Arthouse Galleries, Sydneysolo
2010Dean Home Metro Gallery, Melbournesolo
2009Dean Home Paintbox Gallery, Canberrasolo
2008Dean Home Paintbox Gallery, Canberrasolo
2007Dean Home Arthouse Gallery, Sydneysolo
2007Dean Home Paintbox Gallery, Canberrasolo
2006Dean Home Arthouse Gallery, Sydneysolo
2006Unknown Mandorla Invitational Art Prize Perthgroup
2005Dean Home Church Street Gallery, Perthsolo
2004Dean Home Blacksphere Gallery, Melbournesolo
2004Dean Home Arthouse Gallery, Sydneysolo
2004Unknown Mandorla Invitational Art Prize Perthgroup
2004Unknown Fleurieu Penisula Art of Food and Wine Prize, Finalistgroup
2003Dean Home Qdos Gallery, Lornesolo
2003Dean Home Goya Gallery, Melbournesolo
2002Dean Home Church Gallery, Perthsolo
2002Unknown Mandorla Invitational Art Prize Perthgroup
2001Dean Home Goya Galleries, Melbournesolo
2001Unknown A Private View: Charles Nodrum Gallerygroup
2000Dean Home BMG Galleries, Adelaidesolo
2000Dean Home New Collectables Gallery, Fremantlesolo
1999Dean Home Bulle Galleries, Melbournesolo
1998Unknown Stigma Touring exhibitiongroup
1997Dean Home New Collectables Gallery, Fremantlesolo
1996Dean Home Lyall Burton Gallery, Melbournesolo
1995Dean Home New Collectables Gallery, Fremantlesolo
1995Unknown Moët & Chandon, Touring exhibition – all State galleries & NGA Finalistgroup
1994Dean Home Lyall Burton Gallery, Melbournesolo
1994Dean Home New Collectables Gallery, Fremantlesolo
1994Dean Home Greenaway Galleries, Adelaidesolo
1993Dean Home New Collectables Gallery, Fremantlesolo
1992Dean Home Bunbury Regional Art Gallerysolo
1991Dean Home David Ellis Fine Art, Melbournesolo
1991Dean Home New Collectables Gallery, Fremantle (Perth Festival)solo
1991Unknown Mandorla Invitational Art Prize Perthgroup
1991Unknown New Art, BMG Gallery, Adelaidegroup
1990Dean Home New Collectables Gallery, Fremantlesolo
1989Dean Home David Ellis Fine Art, Melbournesolo
1989Unknown City of Bunbury Art Gallerygroup
1988Dean Home David Ellis Fine Art, Melbournesolo
1984Dean Home Howard Street Galleries, Perthsolo
1983Unknown TVW7 Young Artists Awards, Art Gallery of Western Australia, Finalistgroup
1983Unknown TVW7 Young Artists Awards, Art Gallery of Western Australia, Finalistgroup
1982Unknown TVW7 Young Artists Awards, Art Gallery of Western Australia, Finalistgroup