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Pop Masters on Paper! Hockney, Rauschenberg and Lichtenstein For Your Collection

  • Robert Rauschenberg - Untitled (detail)
January 29, 2020
A philosophy graduate interested in critical theory, politics and art. Alias of Jelena Martinović.

In the 1950s society, one that began promoting the lifestyle of leisure and consumption, the dominant art movement of Abstract Expressionism that centered on the explorations of spirituality seemed detached from the everyday lives of ordinary people. Pop Art, born in the mid-to-late-fifties, immersed itself completely into the mundane living experience, once and for all erasing the boundaries between high and low culture, fine art, and mass production.

A movement that tackled the problem of mass consumption, Pop Art began to include various aspects of mass culture into art, from advertisements to comic books and industrial labeling. While some artists wanted to call attention to mass banality and spiritual nakedness of consumer goods, others were simply appropriating this imagery because they were fond of it, not as referential symbols that scream with meaning.

Among the greatest artists that emerged in this period were David Hockney, Roy Lichtenstein and Robert Rauschenberg. Each having a distinct artistic voice, they all changed the course of the 20th- and 21st-century art in their own right. If you are looking for these Pop masters’ work on paper, look no further than the expansive collection of Artwise. Here are some of the highlights that caught our attention.

Featured image: Robert Rauschenberg – Untitled (detail). All images courtesy of ArtWise.

  • David Hockney - Triple Bill- The Rite of Spring, Le Rossignol, and Oepidus Rex, 1980

David Hockney - Triple Bill- The Rite of Spring, Le Rossignol, and Oedipus Rex, 1980

Arguably Britain’s greatest living painter, David Hockney has redefined the medium of painting during over six decades of creation. Working in a wide range of media with equal measures of wit and intelligence, Hockney has examined, probed, and questioned how to capture the perceived world of movement, space, and time in two dimensions, bringing a whole new creative dimension into contemporary art.

Triple Bill- The Rite of Spring, Le Rossignol, and Oedipus Rex is a poster designed and created by Hockney for the Opera Parade. This was his second commission for the Metropolitan Opera, where he was asked to design the product for the triple bill comprising Igor Stravinsky’s La sacre du printemps (The Rite of Spring)Le rossignol (The Nightingale), and Oedipus Rex. This is the third panel of the set of three, Parade being the first and Stravinsky the second.

Buy the work here.

  • Roy Lichtenstein - Big Painting #6, 2000

Roy Lichtenstein - Big Painting #6, 2000

An artist in the front of the Pop Art movement, Roy Lichtenstein became famous for deceivingly simple works that appropriated from popular comic book characters, pulp fiction, and advertisement. Drawing inspiration from the culture at large, he exemplified Pop Art’s complex relationship with societal change and pop culture.

This serigraph titled Big Painting #6 features elements from Lichtenstein’s famed Brushstrokes series. Questioning the revered status of the painterly mark and fundamental beliefs about the artistic process, he took the essence of painting – the brushstroke – and framed it within the Pop idiom. Reinterpreting these spontaneous marks in a commercial, mass-produced way, he challenged the artistic authority of the era of Abstract Expressionism.

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  • Robert Rauschenberg - Untitled

Robert Rauschenberg - Untitled, 1984

Radical, daring and innovative, Robert Rauschenberg was an irrepressibly prolific artist who time and again reshaped art in the 20th century. Having an original mind and an idea that changed the way we understand art materials and methods, he redefined the role of an artist, the meaning of an artwork, the purpose of the arts as it reflects on the contemporary world around.

In his works, he incorporated materials never considered for painting. He would say one day, “The materials know that we will try something together”. Untitled from 1984 is a hand-assembled collage, signed, numbered, and dated by Rauschenberg, and created with various printing methods and hand-cut paper.

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  • David Hockney - Pearblossom Highway, 1986

David Hockney - Pearblossom Highway, 1986

Hockney experimented with photography and collages, creating groundbreaking works which he calls “Joiners”. He first started making composite images of Polaroid photographs arranged in a rectangular grid, and soon after he switched to regular 35-millimeter prints to create photo collages, physically compiling a complete photograph from a series of individually photographed details.

In 1986, Hockney created a collage compiled from over 700 separate photographs created over several days while in California, depicting the scenic Pearblossom Highway north of Los Angeles. The resulting artwork is a picture of the American landscape from both a driver’s and their passenger’s perspective, representing his belief that people see the world from multiple viewpoints and that our mind pieces these together to form an interpretation of what we see. This particular poster depicting Pearblossom Highway was created by Hockney for an exhibition held at the International Center of Photography in New York.

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  • Roy Lichtenstein - Guggenheim Museum, 1969

Roy Lichtenstein - Guggenheim Museum, 1969

Simply titled Guggenheim Museum, this poster was designed by Roy Lichtenstein for his first solo exhibition at the Guggenheim Museum in New York that took place from September 19th until November 16th, 1969. Helping launch his career, the exhibition consequently toured the U.S. during the height of his fame. In red, black, yellow, and green, this image serves as a personal seal for Lichtenstein’s work, containing elements of his unique style and design in a regal composition.

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  • Robert Rauschenberg - ROCI: Chile, 1985

Robert Rauschenberg - ROCI: Chile, 1985

This exhibition poster was created for ROCI CHILE, as part of the Rauschenberg Overseas Culture Interchange project held at the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes in Santiago in 1985. The majority of the works exhibited at the show were from a series of paintings entitled the Copperheads (1985/1989), where Rauschenberg silkscreened his own photographs onto copper supports and used tarnishing agents to produce somber hues. The use of copper was meant as a sign of solidarity with the Chilean people.

Buy the work here.