After "La Lutte" by Emile Friant, 1889.
As I've gotten older, I've been particularly struck by the staggering number of unintended consequences political (and typically military) actions tend to have for decades after they're made. You'd think that we've been a country long enough to recognize that our decisions matter now AND in the future. We have enough data, enough history, to evaluate the trends accurately. And we can observe other nations' consequences from afar and take heed.
But that's not the context in which we live.
Our political leadership seems to be required to function in the "now." We make decisions with concern for their effect on tomorrow, not next year.
And yet, time, space, nature, any number of cosmic-scaled phenomena don't care about our myopia. Time knows that our behavior has ramifications. Whether we'd like it to or not, the battles we wage now influence the relationships of members of the next generations.
For this piece, I've stacked two boys wrestling in Emile Friant's La Lutte into a diminishing pyramid. Early foundational actions are repeated through future generations, with each new layer becoming less than its ancestors simply because it continues a struggle without pause. The smaller figures simply imitate the maneuvers of their supporting predecessors, never looking upward or outward.
Decisions made by the base reduce the substance of the highest members of the lineage.
As I've gotten older, I've been particularly struck by the staggering number of unintended consequences political (and typically military) actions tend to have for decades after they're made. You'd think that we've been a country long enough to recognize that our decisions matter now AND in the future. We have enough data, enough history, to evaluate the trends accurately. And we can observe other nations' consequences from afar and take heed.
But that's not the context in which we live.
Our political leadership seems to be required to function in the "now." We make decisions with concern for their effect on tomorrow, not next year.
And yet, time, space, nature, any number of cosmic-scaled phenomena don't care about our myopia. Time knows that our behavior has ramifications. Whether we'd like it to or not, the battles we wage now influence the relationships of members of the next generations.
For this piece, I've stacked two boys wrestling in Emile Friant's La Lutte into a diminishing pyramid. Early foundational actions are repeated through future generations, with each new layer becoming less than its ancestors simply because it continues a struggle without pause. The smaller figures simply imitate the maneuvers of their supporting predecessors, never looking upward or outward.
Decisions made by the base reduce the substance of the highest members of the lineage.

About The Gallery

JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY is a collective environment of creative visions featuring monthly exhibitions of (inter)national, emerging to established, contemporary artists.
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