For some time, I was looking for a technique that would allow me to transfer the aesthetic of some of my sculptures to a two-dimensional format in order to to graphically enhance the visual force and magic of the pieces. This led me to find a traditional technique known as Nierika , images created through spreading beeswax onto wooden boards, and pressing in hand-painted yarn designs, crafted by the Wixarikas or Huicholes in San Andres Cohamiata, a village in the middle of a mountain range in the north of the state of Jalisco, Mexico.
This technique is used to represent the gods of these people, and also to represent the visions that their shamans have. I believe that this makes the relationship between the images that are depicted in this series and their meaning clearer.
When I saw the first finished piece, I noticed the very precise way in which "Nierika" complemented the pieces belonging to this series and I included that relevance in the title choice. The original meaning of the sculptures from which these worsted yarn pieces were inspired was restructured and found a clearer meaning- the empty space represented by pale gray is fragmented by the images in the picture, and these conditions in this space are what I seek when I produce new pieces.
These pieces were elaborated in the family workshop of the master Manolo Castro Montoya ''Muwieritemay''. The second cause is meant to be an explanation of the first

About The Gallery

OMR was founded in 1983 and through over 400 exhibitions and 20 years of participation in art fairs, has developed
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