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Paint Your Collection Blue!

  • Moses & Taps - INVIDA (detail)
June 13, 2019
A philosophy graduate interested in critical theory, politics and art. Alias of Jelena Martinović.

The history of the color blue in art dips into the most philosophical and spiritual ideas shared throughout the world. At one stage in history, the blue art pigment was considered the most expensive and unique, as it was not easy to make. Since then, the color has continued to evolve, and its association with calming, natural elements like the sky and clear water have solidified it as a universal favorite among artists.

We bring you artworks dominated by blue hues which you can add to your collection right now!

Featured image: Moses & Taps – INVIDA (detail). All images courtesy of their respective galleries.

  • Grear Patterson - Two Hands in the Sand, 2016

Grear Patterson - Two Hands in the Sand

Working with photography, painting and sculpture, Grear Patterson creates arrangements of custom made image carriers, establishing connections with art history as well as with his own specific living environment. His works are characterized by freedom and ease that originates in a utopian reality seen from the perfect uncontaminated view of a childlike mind.

The artist first started painted sunsets inspired by Hollywood movies, later picking up the form of the setting sun through the shape of the image carrier, just like in Two Hands in the Sand from 2016. This idealized landscape contains elements of purity and evocativeness.

See more info about the work here.

  • LX ONE - Spectre 1, 2016

LX ONE - Spectre 1

In his abstract works, the French artist LX ONE plays with shapes, colors and materials, mixing wood, paper, cardboard and paint. He explores the pixel, examining the base of the form and the skeletons of colors. Evoking movement, light and shadows through color changes, he creates illusionary, unreal spaces through this alternate mode of seeing.

Revolving around shapes, the geometric work Spectre 1 creates a system of tensions in the free space. Drawing from architecture, urbanism and design, it alternates between plain and empty space using the colors as a bridge.

See more info about the work here.

  • Xie Lei - Pensive, 2016

Xie Lei - Pensive

Working between Paris and Beijing, Xie Lei has chosen painting as the medium that can best articulate his world. Exploring the medium’s richness and infinite possibilities, he pictorially translates his sensitivity and his sense of poetry. Neither strictly figurative nor abstract, his works are imbued by classical codes of representation, inviting us to look differently at the world around us.

The work Pensive reflects our questioning of existence, our search for identity and the knowledge of our vulnerability.

See more info about the work here.

  • Moses Taps - INVIDA

Moses and Taps - INVIDA

A world-renowned German graffiti art duo, Moses & Taps made their name with their art collective TOP SPRAYER. Their first project was to paint 1000 trains all over the world in 1000 days, using each other’s names. Their ever-changing pseudonym, which shifts between Moses & TapsTM, Erni & BertTM, TopsprayerTM and AliasTM, helps conceal the true identities of its members while still defying the unwritten laws of graffiti.

In the work INVIDA, the duo harnesses the power of a spray can, fusing the distinct visual language of graffiti with abstract art.

See more info about the work here.

  • Seb Janiak - Photon 06 (Large), 2012

Seb Janiak - Photon 06

The French artist Seb Janiak explores various characteristics of natural phenomenon. Constantly devoted to the surreal atmosphere of a world after tomorrow, he creates photographs which materialize his thoughts on spirituality and existence. Exploring conditions in which opposites can co-exist, revealing the visual characteristics of the hidden forces that shape the physical universe.

In the Photon series, Janiak explores the intrinsic duality of light. The series relies on an idea that when an observer sees light, its nature changes. He uses a prism as an intermediary between the eye and what is visible, enabling invisible white light to be decomposed into seven primary colors.

See more info about the work here.

  • Michal Skapa - Hype, 2016

Michal Skapa - Hype

A Czech street artist who was a big part of the most expressive wave of graffiti writers that shaped that nation’s urban scene during the 1990s and 2000s, Michal Škapa works with various media and formats, from murals, acrylic manuscript abstraction and airbrush figurative compositions to site-specific installations and spatial objects.

The work Hype features unique graffiti calligraphy, reflecting the dynamic and movement of the artist’s hand.

See more info about the work here.

  • Sol LeWitt - Untitled (from the 4 x 4 portfolio), 1991

Sol LeWitt - Untitled (from the 4 x 4 portfolio)

Helping establish Conceptual Art and Minimalism of the postwar era, Sol LeWitt created wall drawings, structures, painting and conceptual pieces. Believing that the idea or concept is the most important aspect of the work, he perceived creation as an intellectual and pragmatic act, contributing to the emergence of the new radical aesthetics of the 1960s.

A seemingly monochromatic work, Untitled breaks down actions, forms and adjectives down into terms, serially repeated and reconfigured such as grids and lines.

See more info about the work here.

  • Shepard Fairey - Flint Eye Alert Globe

Shepard Fairey - Flint Eye Alert Globe

An American contemporary street artist, graphic designer, activist, and illustrator who emerged from the skateboarding scene, Shepard Fairey has been inspiring generations of artists with his thought-provoking and often controversial pieces. An icon of the contemporary art scene in the country and beyond, he has always been an artist who speaks his mind through his art.

The piece Flint Eye Alert Globe is based on a painting the artist created for his Earth Crisis show in Paris. The shades of blue/turquoise serve as a connection to the air and water that is essential to sustaining life on planet Earth. This specific piece is about the idea that we need to see what is right in front of us and how dependent on nature we are.

See more info about the work here.

  • Jeff Koons - Balloon Dog (Blue), 2002

Jeff Koons - Balloon Dog (Blue)

Often described as a king of postmodernism, Jeff Koons is one of the most influential and controversial artists of the post-war era. Working somewhere in between high and low culture, he often creates work inspired by familiar objects and symbols from our everyday lives.

The piece Ballon Dog (Blue) from 1991 references his iconic, monumental sculpture of the same name from his famous Celebration series. For this occasion, Koons mined childhood signifiers such as birthday parties to recreate moments of innocence and fun. This smaller version of the renowned sculpture is created out of cast porcelain coated with a reflective finish.

See more info about the work here.

  • Rene Magritte - La Tete

Rene Magritte - La Tete

An iconic Surrealist painter, Rene Magritte is celebrated for his dreamlike aesthetic and evocative symbols. His works are imbued with a powerful paradox, featuring images that are beautiful in their clarity and simplicity, but which also provoke unsettling thoughts.

A sky blue sculptural head of a beautiful woman, eyes peacefully closed as if caught in the midst of a dream, La Tete appears as if floating in midair. A reoccurring motif within Magritte’s works, this sculpted visage is oftentimes associated with the human mind or memory and the fleeting or unreliable nature of our thoughts and emotions.

See more info about the work here.