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Artworks by These Famous Artists Available Now on ArtSnap!

  • Henri Matisse - La tristesse du roi (detail), 1952
February 20, 2020
A philosophy graduate interested in critical theory, politics and art. Alias of Jelena Martinović.

Comprised of a team of art lovers who want to help people to enjoy owning artworks, ArtSnap is an online gallery with a carefully curated selection of wide-ranging pieces by exclusively established contemporary and modern artists. Alongside works and artists you already love, they seek help you discover new favorites along the way.

We have browsed through fellow ArtSnap‘s trusted marketplace to bring you some amazing works by the biggest names in art out there that you can add to your collection right now!

Featured image: Henri Matisse – La tristesse du roi (detail), 1952. All images courtesy of ArtSnap.

  • Tracey Emin - My Favorite Little Bird, 2015

Tracey Emin - My Favorite Little Bird, 2015

A prominent member of the Young British Artists, Tracey Emin is celebrated for poignant work across a variety of media. Drawing from her autobiographical details, she tackles such themes as relationships, human behavior and gender with brutal honesty and dark humor.

An offset lithograph printed in color, My Favorite Little Bird from 2015 is inspired by one of Emin’s neons which are particularly poignant for their inherent contradictions. These works provide an insight into that which is private with poetic humor and unabashed self-reflection.

  • James Rosenquist - For Love, 1965

James Rosenquist - For Love, 1965

The artist who helped define the Pop Art movementJames Rosenquist is famous for the appropriation of the advertising and mass media imagery and collaging and juxtaposing them in Surrealist fashion to create often abstract and provocative pieces with strong narratives. His works served as a critique of the American consumerist society during the 1960s.

Published for the 11 Pop Artists volume III portfolio by Original Editions, For Love from 1965 is a screenprint on paper based on one of his collages. According to Rosenquist, through these collages of images, he sought to create “a kind of motion in the mind”, questioning America’s mainstream cultural values by its own popular advertising imagery.

  • Marc Quinn - We Share Our Chemistry With The Stars (KN200R), 2019

Marc Quinn - We Share Our Chemistry With The Stars (KN200R), 2019

Provocative artist Marc Quinn created an oeuvre that spans sculpture, installation and painting. He is most famous for his sculptural portraits composed of organic materials, but he also fabricates sculptures using more traditional media such as bronze, often depicting contorted bodies or people with unusual physical characteristics.

Featuring an iris as a motif, We Share Our Chemistry With The Stars (KN200R) from 2019 belongs to the series of works that explore individuality. Being as singular as fingerprints, the artist refers to the eyes as “the doors of perception, the portal between inner and outer, and the link between us and the world”.

  • Bambi - Save Our Homo Sapiens (With David), 2019

Bambi - Save Our Homo Sapiens (With David), 2019

Taking on the name of one of the most famous Disney characters, Bambi is the pseudonym of a female contemporary British stencil artist. Renowned for her ability to speak her mind freely and uncompromisingly despite any potential consequences, she employs representational imagery to offer social commentary and address political concerns.

Titled Save Our Homo Sapiens (With David), this 2019 work features two orangutans, David Attenborough and Greta Thunberg, sending a strong message about climate change.

  • Shepard Fairey - Church of Consumption, 2017

Shepard Fairey - Church of Consumption, 2017

An icon of the contemporary art scene, Shepard Fairey has always been an artist who speaks his mind through his art. Emerging from the skateboarding scene, he has been inspiring generations of artists with his thought-provoking and often controversial pieces.

Titled Church of Consumption, this print from 2017 deals with themes of material obsession, patterns around social currency and status signifiers, and complacency on deeper issues resulting from the perpetual distractions of shallower concerns. The artist sought to raise awareness on the collective psychology that pleasure and status are largely derived from superficial consumption.

  • Max Bill - Ohne Titel (From Homage to Picasso Portfolio), 1972

Max Bill - Ohne Titel (From Homage to Picasso Portfolio), 1972

A Swiss architect, artist, painter, typeface designer, industrial designer and graphic designer, Max Bill was the founder of the Concrete Art movement. He once reflected that he believes it is possible to develop an art largely on the basis of mathematical thinking.

A lithograph in colors, Ohne Titel (From Homage to Picasso Portfolio) from 1972 is a geometric work characterized by a clarity of design and precise proportions.

  • Gerald Laing - AAD, 1968

Gerald Laing - AAD, 1968

A British pop artist and sculptor, Gerald Laing emerged on the British Pop Art scene in 1962. In 1965, he dramatically shifted his practice towards sculpture, devoting the next forty years to the discipline, only to return to painting to reflect upon the Iraq War and the consistent amplification of celebrity culture.

Titled AAD, this work from 1968 is a screenprint in colors printed on smooth wove paper.

  • Cory Arcangel - Lozenge Composition, 1924 : Tableau No.IV Losangique Pyramidal, 1925, With Red, Blue, Yellow and Black, 1924:1925 Titled No.III, 2012

Cory Arcangel - Lozenge Composition, 1924 / Tableau No.IV Losangique Pyramidal, 1925, With Red, Blue, Yellow and Black, 1924/1925 Titled No.III, 2012

A New York post-conceptual artist, Cory Arcangel makes work in many different media, including drawing, music, video, performance art, and video game modifications, for which he is perhaps best known.

Titled Lozenge Composition, 1924 / Tableau No.IV Losangique Pyramidal, 1925, With Red, Blue, Yellow and Black, 1924/1925 Titled No.III, 2012, this work is based on a page torn from a textbook and memorialized in an editioned print. Mondrian’s Lozenge painting, famously oriented at 45 degrees, is here set upright in traditional square form, activating art history through a disruptive lens.

  • Henri Matisse - La tristesse du roi, 1952

Henri Matisse - La tristesse du roi, 1952

One of the most influential artists of the twentieth century, Henri Matisse is celebrated for stylistic innovations which fundamentally altered the course of modern art and greatly affected the works of several generations of younger painters that followed. His brilliant use of color and exaggerated form was truly groundbreaking at the time.

La tristesse du roi from 1952 references one of Rembrandt’s canvases, David Jouant de la harpe devant Saul (David Playing the Harp before Saul), in which the young biblical hero plays to distract the King from his melancholy, as well as to the late self-portraits of the old Dutch master. Matisse represented himself by this black form, surrounded by the pleasures which have enriched his life.

  • The Connor Brothers - I Can Resist Everything, 2016

The Connor Brothers - I Can Resist Everything, 2016

Mike Snelle and James Golding, better known as The Connor Brothers, are celebrated for their often humorous work is steeped in references to both historical and popular culture and presents an almost anthropological view of contemporary western society.

The duo is best known for their satirical reinterpretations of Mills & Boon book covers and cynical views of the contemporary culture, exploring concepts of truth and fiction, often blurring the line between the two and raising questions about the process by which people turn the experience into meaning. The work I Can Resist Everything from 2016 is part of this series.