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Own a Work From Hiro Ando's Studio Crazy Noodles!

  • Ryoko Watanabe - red umbrella (detail), 2011
November 8, 2019
A philosophy graduate interested in critical theory, politics and art. Alias of Jelena Martinović.

A leading figure of the Japanese Neo-Pop Art, Hiro Ando is best known for work conflating traditional and present-day Japan. He recontextualizes his country’s icons such as the maneki-neko (lucky cat), samurai warriors, sumo wrestlers, and koi fish, by reformatting them as colorful sculptures.

Ando is also the co-founder of Studio Crazy Noodles, which organizes and promotes the creative activities of young artists of the new Japanese pop wave. Since the very beginning, these individuals are given total freedom of expression while encouraged to embrace group work methods to ensure the most creative artistic production. While each of their artists has a unique vision, they all take popular culture as they know it and integrate it into their works, elevating it to the level of high art.

We have made a selection of artworks by artists nourished by Studio Crazy Noodles and represented by Galerie Jacob Paulett. You can add any of these to your collection right now!

Featured image: Ryoko Watanabe – Red Umbrella (detail), 2011. All images courtesy of Galerie Jacob Paulett.

  • Yoshihiro Fujita - 986 532, 2009

Yoshihiro Fujita - 986 532

The Japanese artist Yoshihiro Fujita is best known for his close-ups of the eyes inspired by Manga comics and cartoons. In Japanese culture, eyes are some of the most potent indicators of various moods and intentions. With his work, Fujita is looking to contribute to the spreading of Japanese aesthetics beyond the borders of his home country.

Although Fujita does not depict the real human eyes, he manages to reflect the most diverse states of mind. Only a narrow strip of skin containing the eyes, 986 532 demonstrates the artist’s exceptional painting skills.

See more info about the work here.

  • Sumomo Kanashiwa - flying angel, 2009

Sumomo Kanashiwa - Flying Angel

Although Argentina-based, Sumomo Kanashiwa draws inspiration from the Japanese manga and animation culture. Her work features mostly female subjects with wide-eyes and universal blue-gray skin tone, often placed in surreal settings. These characters often appear lost in their own thoughts and in their own world.

Flying Angel features a pink-haired girl who tends to be innocent and naïve but is at the same time provocative and seductive.

See more info about the work here.

  • Tomomi Mishima - sliders, 2008

Tomomi Mishima - Sliders

A painter from Japan, Tomomi Mishima focuses on the ideas of modernity and independence in the lifestyle of Japanese women. He depicts good looking girls dressed in fashionable clothes as a unique illustration of a virtual role model. At the same time, these characters reflect the changes in Japanese society in the face of the influences from western culture and media.

In Sliders, two schoolgirls are placed against a recognizable background constructed from garishly colored pills. The female subjects, featuring simple hairstyles, white shirts and skirts in Burberry check pattern, are in contrast with the background characterized by a combination of vivid colors and divided surfaces.

See more info about the work here.

  • Ryoko Watanabe - red umbrella, 2011

Ryoko Watanabe - Red Umbrella

Through her oil paintings, Ryoko Watanabe seeks to preserve the traditions of Japan. She depicts themes from her state’s culture by blending some ancient aspects of Japan with regular elements from modern everyday life. In her work, the traditional and powerful stereotypical characters of Japan, such as the sumotori, geisha and samurai warriors, are placed in contemporary settings.

The painting Red Umbrella features a geisha with an umbrella against the black and white background of the street crowd in contemporary Japan. Put in the first plane and highlighted with color, this cult figure is stolen from her context and transported to a place reserved for one of us.

See more info about the work here.

  • Kaho Nakamura - sweet vanilla, 2008

Kaho Nakamura - Sweet Vanilla

The work of the Japanese painter Kaho Nakamura mirrors the way young artists today think, trying to break through barriers set by older, more experienced artists. Nakamura explores themes from modern culture using a striking method in oil that has a strong visual and encompassing atmosphere. Her paintings are often sexual, focusing mostly on depicting Japanese women in different poses while they’re bending, stretching or simply relaxing.

The work Sweet Vanilla features a single female figure which gives the work an additional dose of intimacy. As in each of her pieces, the artist managed to find a nice balance between naked and covered body parts of her subject.

See more info about the work here.

  • Saori Nakamishi - jellygreen, 2009

Saori Nakamishi - Jellygreen

Saori Nakamishi is another Japanese artist who creates her work in the best tradition of Manga. While deeply involved with manga aesthetics and themes, her work is mainly realistic. It features sexy and beautiful under-aged Lolitas in many different situations.

In the work Jellygreen, an erotic but innocent girl is placed against a fluorescent green background alongside a character from Power Pop Girls.

See more info about the work here.

  • Kumikaho Oshima - he is looking to her, 2009

Kumikaho Oshima - He Is Looking To Her

Two main recurring motifs in the work of Kumikaho Oshima are Barbies and US Dollars. Japan is plagued by consumerism as much as the Western cultures are and Oshima’s goal is to illustrate the condition of modern Japanese women in this context. His works are satirical and profound, criticizing the appropriation of western trends, symbols and values in Japanese culture.

In the work He Is Looking To Her, Barbie is posing seductively while being observed by Benjamin Franklin from the $100 bill. The artist comments on how Japanese women began to perceive money as power and material goods not only as a luxury but more as a necessity.

See more info about the work here.

  • Aya Toshikawa - shuya5, serie of 5 lovedolls, 2015

Aya Toshikawa - Shuya5, Series of 5 Lovedolls

Aya Toshikawa, also known as Lady Kawai, has integrated animation into the world of fine arts. Drawing from Manga culture, she depicts babyface characters, Lolitas, lascivious girls and other provocative subjects that seduce the viewer’s imagination. Her girls have attractive faces and great bodies emphasized with their minimalistic clothes.

The monochrome sculpture Shuya5, Series of 5 Lovedolls depicts an innocent but lascivious Lolita in underwear, posing seductively.

See more info about the work here.

  • Ioam Yumako - red shodo, 2011

Ioam Yumako - Red Shodo

An alias for Milosh Herzig, Ioam Yumako makes fine oil paintings with motifs of Japanese contemporary culture. His large-scale works demonstrate the artist’s great attention to detail, focusing for example on the eyes of his figures. Using light and color in innovative ways, he manages to enrich the painting with an illusion of movement and motion.

The work Red Shodo combines a hyperrealistic approach with pop culture technicolor. The artist managed to show the nature of the character just by catching his facial expression. His characters in general always personify innocence, purity or wisdom.

See more info about the work here.

  • Jimmy Yoshimura - black eyes and yellow hair, 2009

Jimmy Yoshimura - Black Eyes And Yellow Hair

Jimmy Yoshimura is known for combining the past and present, depicting interesting representations of characters from different eras. Her work combines cartoonish subjects and real people from old photographs, referencing the influence of the Western culture on Japan.

In the work Black Eyes And Yellow Hair, Yoshimura’s characters became distorted people captured between their ancestors and foreign propaganda.

See more info about the work here.