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Textile Wall Art You'll Love!

  • Okuda San Miguel - Praying in Calcutta (detail), 2018
November 28, 2019
A philosophy graduate interested in critical theory, politics and art. Alias of Jelena Martinović.

For thousands of years, people have been practicing the craft of designing or creating textiles and textile art. In the 20th century, artists began to use textiles in new contexts and fabric and string as a medium have provided almost infinite possibilities in modern and contemporary artistic practices.

Penetrating average households as activities mainly reserved for women, these crafts were identified with domesticity and women’s creativity, demoted to a “feminine craft” characteristic of a thrifty wife. With the Feminist Art Movement in the 1960s and 1970s, the realm of high art has been reclaimed to include artistic practices that had traditionally been relegated to the lower status of women’s work. Ever since, textile art has been developing new forms and language, involving many creative along the way who have been experimenting with techniques, materials and concepts

If you are looking to add a textile wall art piece to your collection, whether being an embroidery, tapestry or patchwork, check out this curated selection from our marketplace.

Featured image: Okuda San Miguel – Praying in Calcutta (detail), 2018. All images courtesy of their respective galleries.

  • Etnik - 5 LMNZ, 2019

Etnik - 5 LMNZ

Working on the street art scene since the early 90s, the Italian artist Etnik has developed a visual language characterized by geometrical and architectural forms. These works combine lettering and abstraction, demonstrating the artist’s great sense of balance and composition.

Tinted and woven wool on burlap, mounted on a frame, 5 LMNZ is executed in the artist’s distinct geometrical style, imbued with real depth and perspective.

Buy the work here.

  • Okuda San Miguel - Praying in Calcutta, 2018

Okuda San Miguel - Praying in Calcutta

One of the best known Spanish street artist, Okuda San Miguel is known for his unique iconographic language of multicolored geometric structures and patterns. In these vibrant works, rainbow geometric architectures blend with organic shapes, bodies without identity, headless animals and symbols.

Okuda often works with textiles, embroidering his works with wool and thread – a technique he learned from his mother. The work Praying in Calcutta depicts a nun-like figure executed in the artist’s distinct style of rainbow colors.

Buy the work here.

  • Daniel Silver - Body Landscape Dance 1

Daniel Silver - Body Landscape Dance 1

A London-based artist, Daniel Silver is best known for his figurative sculptures influenced by the art of ancient Greece, Modernist sculpture and Freudian psychoanalytic theory. These works speak of the intimacy of touch and the memories inherited through material.

Examining the physical and emotional impact of the body and its representation, the artist often works in other media as well. Made of clothing fabrics, Body Landscape Dance 1 is composed of immediately and roughly cut shapes representing a body moving in time and space.

Buy the work here.

  • Grayson Perry - Britain is Best, 2014

Grayson Perry - Britain is Best

An English contemporary artist, Grayson Perry is a great chronicler of contemporary life, drawing us in with wit, affecting sentiment and nostalgia as well as, at times, fear and anger. His works address universally human subjects such as identity, gender, social status, sexuality, at the same time containing autobiographical references, including the artist’s childhood, his family and crossdressing.

An embroidery in a frame, Britain is Best shows five loyalists from East Belfast. The artist deliberately chose a very colorful and jolly style, evoking murals that can be seen everywhere in East Belfast, which veers heavily toward the dour and aggressive.

Buy the work here.

  • Emily Mae Smith - Neptune's Net Blason

Emily Mae Smith - Neptune's Net Blason

The American artist Emily Mae Smith created lively compositions that offer sly social and political commentary. Her work nods to historical painting movements such as Symbolism, Surrealism and Pop Art, with a lexicon of signs speaking to contemporary subjects such as gender, sexuality, capitalism and violence.

A custom patch design for Blazers / Blasons, Neptune’s Net Blason is a mechanical embroidery in pastel colors.

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  • Linde - January, 1979

Linde – January

The work of the contemporary artist Linde was included in the Edition Domberger calendar of 1980, more specifically the International Contemporary Art.

Created in 1979, January is composed of colorful strips of textile brought together through a patchwork technique.

Buy the work here.

  • Alexandre Bavard - Kappa Nike, 2018

Alexandre Bavard - Kappa Nike

A Parisian multidisciplinary artist, Alexandre Bavard is known for bridging the process of his outdoor work into compelling art pieces and performative body of work. He continuously experiments with techniques, materials and processes, integrating diverse visual media like performance, sculpture, graffiti, photography, assemblage, textiles and found objects deemed Neo-Archaeologia.

Kappa Nike is among the works completed during the Justkids arts residency program in San Juan, Puerto Rico. In this series of large canvases and installations, the artist used counterfeit materials and fabrics, referencing iconic brands such as Balenciaga or Champion with his distinct humor.

Buy the work here.

  • Etel Adnan Envol

Etel Adnan – Envol

A Lebanese-American poet, essayist, and visual artist, Etel Adnan is known for her vibrantly colored, abstracted renditions of mountains, ocean and sky. As she once explained, her artworks are not particular landscapes, but a memory of a particular landscape.

A wool-tapestry, Envol is an abstract rendition of a flock of birds set against diverse landscapes.

Buy the work here.