Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someone

The Art of Narrating in Different Languages - Tellas and Ciredz in an Interview

  • artist's job isn't to make cookies
February 5, 2017
Alias of Ksenija Pantelić

Touching upon their beginnings in the same land, and the shared fascination of nature’s landscapes, Ciredz and Tellas interview reveals the rooted need to understand nature, to experiment with different mediums, and to remain open to all the possibilities both life and art offer. Their latest project Misplaced at the MAGMA gallery in Bologna was the reason why we decided to organize the two interviews in hope of finding what lies behind the abstract images, their latest installation piece, and how the material of their choice reflect the essence of our world. The collaboration between the two artists is anything but new and one that for sure adds to the growing world of street and urban art culture. Receiving recognition for his complex combination of form and space, Tellas is regarded as one of the 100 best international emerging artists, while his fellow artist Ciredz’s minimalistic approach to the exploration of an intestine relationship between the humans and nature has also received worldwide recognition.

The exclusive Ciredz and Tellas interview also reveals the views of the two artists regarding the street art culture and what the future holds for them.

tellas interview. glassdoor
Tellas – Photo by Ralph Roelse. Photo credits by artist

Exclusive Tellas Interview – Working Both Inside and Outside

Widewalls: You are known to work across an array of art disciplines, from drawing, through to paintings, videos, and installations. Regardless of the fact that you enjoy experimenting, is there a discipline that you turn to more often, and if there is, would you explain to us why is it so?

Tellas: My work is based on experimentation. In my artistic path, I’ve started working with drawing, and then moved to printing technique, engraving, and analogic photography. I like the idea of narrating things through different languages. Furthermore, I’m interested in installations: in recent years I’ve both worked outdoor, for example with the series ‘Spettro’, and indoor, like the last installation for the ‘outdoor festival’ in Rome for instance.

W: We know that Nature is important for you and for your work. How do you decide what element of the natural world is the one for a particular piece?

T: I don’t think there is a particular element I prefer, what I try to do is giving importance to Nature in general, which is by now underpowered by cement and an incessant abuse by man. In my latest murals, as for example “Fog” in Sheffield, I’ve focused on my palette, opting for the same colors as the place in which I was working. Inside the studio, my work is quite different, I try to diversify depending on the medium. I don’t find any utility in making similar works in different supports: every space needs to have a peculiar work.

MAGMA Gallery - Misplaced exhibition, Installation view available for view on the website
MAGMA Gallery – Misplaced exhibition, Installation view

Misplaced

W: Why does the exhibition hold the title Misplaced? What point of view does it help to illustrate?

T: The idea of Misplaced is that of opposing different elements: while I’ve worked with lightweight and fragile materials as paper and canvas, Roberto has used concrete and soil. Cement and nature are structurally in contrast since, depending on the circumstances, one of the two turn out to be out of place.

With the aim of expressing this concept in some ways, we decide to create a site-specific installation able to transmit the sensation on been misplaced to the spectator.

W: How can you describe your very particular style and its connection to the style of your fellow artist Ciredz? What was the glue which bonded you again and made you decide to embark on yet another project together?

T: Sure enough, the work of an artist is fully determined by his birthplace as well as by the place in which he has grown and lived. Roberto and I have grown in the same land, a Mediterranean island called Sardegna, in which the presence of the landscape is preponderant. I think this is the element which unifies us, both being inspired by the relationship between man and nature. Of course, our aesthetic taste is quite different, but most of the time easily compatible. It has been a long time since we started to nurture this project: thanks to Magma Gallery, finally, we realized it.

W: Presently, what factor excites you the most regarding the street art culture you are a part of?

T: I am enthusiastic about the possibility of traveling and meeting new places and people. This is also a great incentive for my creativity, which constantly develops in something else. Travels gave me the chance to confront and collaborate with many artists, something that could not happen inside my studio, more intimate and personal.

W: How do you see street art culture developing in the future? Can you also tell us a little bit about your own future plans?

T: Over the last years, street art culture has considerably leveled up, both from the organizational point of view and from the aesthetic one. Worse luck, we witness the phenomenon of over-production. Some cities are invaded by murals and, as I see it, some of these artistic interventions risk to be excessive. Over time, this can constitute a serious problem. Do we really want our cities overflowing with colors and images? In the coming months, I plan on undertaking some new projects in Eastern Europe, and in the U.S.A.

ciredz's jobs
Roberto Ciredz

Exclusive Ciredz Interview – Attempting to Find the Balance for the Nature’s Equilibrum

Widewalls: The relationship between mankind and nature is the central element of your very distinctive style. In your opinion, what is the nature of this relationship?

Ciredz: In my opinion, it has always been a coexistence relationship, in balance between adaptation and tolerance. Thinking of our times, it is worthwhile thinking that if, on the one hand, few individuals choose to live in symbiosis with nature, venerating and fully respecting it, on the other hand, the vast majority of human being get away from it, dramatically compromising its equilibrium.

W: Why have you decided to focus on the creation of abstract pieces? What does abstraction allow, which, realistic depictions possibly may not?

C: I’ve been drawing since I was a child, at first influenced by comics and cartoons, reaching then at the academic drawing. After years of figurative drawings, I suddenly found the idea of representing the world around me completely useless and unsatisfactory.

Collaboration between Tellas and Ciredz - Misplaced, installation view at MAGMA gallery the joined jobs. job
Collaboration between Tellas and Ciredz – Misplaced, installation view at MAGMA gallery

Two Languages Coming Together

W: Project Misplaced at MAGMA Gallery reflects upon the changes in the world. What changes concerned you the most while you were creating your pieces for the show?

C: There isn’t a particular event that motivates my creativity, in general, I’m fascinated by the “intellect/insanity” of human actions towards nature.

W: Very distinctive are the pieces which you have created with soil and concrete. What was it like to work with such materials, and why did you choose them in the first place?

C: The use of concrete and soil moved hand in hand with the abstraction in my work. The two mediums coexist and dominate the urbanized landscape. I’m fascinated by the graphic result that comes from the combination of them.

W: How can you describe your very particular style and its connection to the style of your fellow artist Tellas? What was the glue which bonded you again and made you decide to embark on yet another project together?

C: Tellas and I come from the same studies and the same land. The connection between our works – that are esthetically different – arise from the same sensitivity and the same perceptions. I think this is the most important perspective about our many collaborations. Two different languages connected by the same contents.

W: Presently, what factor excites you the most regarding the street art culture you are a part of?

C: Honestly, I don’t consider my work as “Street art”, I think it remained just a term to classify a specific kind of events, moving closer to public art. I like to see my work developing on different landscapes, to travel and confront with many locations.

W: How do you see street art culture developing in the future? Can you also tell us a little bit about your own future plans?

C: In my opinion, the situation will remain the same for the next future, as long as people wants to see painted walls in their cities until something different will succeed. In my next projects, I want to focus more on outdoor installations and sculptures, even if wall paintings will remain an important part of my work.

Main room MAGMA gallery Misplaced Exhibition and its perfect glassdoor
Main room MAGMA gallery Misplaced Exhibition

All images used for illustrative purposes only. Featured image: Ciredz – VOLUME 4, Sculpture installation for Viavai Project, 2016