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Disobedient Objects

  • Disobedient Objects
April 15, 2014
Ana Bambic Kostov is an art historian with passion for contemporary art.

Political activism has proved to be a powerful motivator over the centuries, but what is rarely considered is its inspirational potential. Disobedient Objects is an upcoming exhibition, organized by Victoria and Albert Museum in London, dedicated to exploration of the great role of objects that accompanied great social change movements had. The exhibition will showcase how situations of crisis ignite new creativity, Disobedient Objects will be the first exhibition of such sort, focused on the period from the late 1970s to the present, our time, rich with technological advancement, political shifts and increasing social consciousness. The show will present a collection of inspiring artifacts, from finely defaced currency, designs for blockades and barricades, political video games, to inflatables, odd bicycles and reactionary ceramics.

Announced to open this July, Disobedient Objects will run throughout the

year until February 1, 2015, leaving plenty of time for everyone hungry for

rebel culture to visit.

Urban art
Coral Stoakes – I wish my boyfriend was as dirty as your policies

Carrie Reichardt’s Disobedient Objects

One of the urban artists we love, the one and only rebellious ceramics maker, Carrie Reichardt, will be exhibiting at the Disobedient Objects show. The word is she will be shown next to the Suffragettes, another ceramic feature of the display. Mad in England creator’s pieces will add a much necessary dose of the present day rebellion to the array of historical artifacts. The show is announced as pioneering, but Carrie’s work is no less radical. She successfully unites traditional, kitschy aesthetics into pieces that tell an unexpected story. They are all little gems of propaganda against the corrupt policies and the wrongs of the current British society, which the artist conveys by altering, mocking and deliberately distorting traditional symbols of monarchy. Carrie Reichardt fights for all of our rights, from a feminine, but tough point, engaging even the most uninterested trinket lovers to think and react.

Disobedient Objects
Ed Hall

The range of Disobedient Objects

The entire exhibition will be honoring the creative disobedience, divided into four sections based on type of social activity – direct action, speaking out, making worlds and solidarity. A specially commissioned film will lead the viewer through the history of social change design, emphasizing the ways in which it changed the officials’ perception and the police treatment of the protestors, to media coverage and navigation.

Disobedient Objects
Iraqi women puppets

The exhibition will include three puppets used in protests against the initial Gulf War by the politically radical American Bread and Puppet Theater, evoking the long tradition of employing large puppets in social protesting. A comprehensive selection of redone pamphlets and placards will also be shown, including the one made by gay rights activists in Russia and used in 2012 demonstrations. Inflatable protestor structures, gas mask from 2013 Istanbul demonstrations and many other witnesses to the newer history will all on display at Victoria and Albert Museum this summer.

A satellite exhibition will be opened on the 1st of May, investigating a century of activist posters. A collection of around 70 posters, from Votes for Women to the more recent Occupy movements from the V&A collection will be on view announcing the Disobedient Objects.

urban art
Carrie Reichardt – Mad in England