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  • Widewalls Editors Pick
  • Widewalls Editors Pick
  • Widewalls Editors Pick
  • Widewalls Editors Pick
  • Widewalls Editors Pick
  • Widewalls Editors Pick

Editors' Pick: Summer’s Warm Welcome

July 3, 2015
Studied Photography at IED in Milan, Italy. Passionate about art, frequent visitor of exhibitions, Widewalls photography specialist and Editorial Manager.

If the month of May was marked by the opening of Venice Biennale, then June’s highlight moment was definitely Art Basel in Basel, the second of three fairs taking place annually (the other two being, as you know, in Miami Beach and Hong Kong). As expected, it went more than well, and the art world had the opportunity to, once again, enjoy the best of its artists. The Swiss city of Basel hosted two other art fairs as well, a bit overshadowed by the frenzy of Art Basel – Rhy Art Fair and VOLTA 11, both very much up to their tasks. All in all, it was a great time to be in Basel.

When it comes to contemporary art within gallery walls, the past month was a great introduction to summer and all the shows that come with it around the world. On view right now or very soon, there are artists like Michael Borremans, Vernon Fisher, Christy Lee Rogers, Shepard Fairey, Marc Quinn and Zio Ziegler, among others, while amazing group shows are taking place at galleries like Photology, MYA, Jonathan LeVine, New Image Art and Peres Projects. Interesting things happened outdoors as well – Anish Kapoor installed a sculpture that apparently represents Queen’s vagina at Versailles, graffiti served as a new attraction in Paris, instead of love locks, and Shepard Fairey is facing jail time because he painted some walls in Detroit.

Here at Widewalls, we felt like traveling. But not just – we wanted to take a tour around the world in form of Art Travel Special features and get to know different art scenes and all their hidden gems. On our journey, we explored cities like Culver City, California, Barcelona, Spain, Detroit, Michigan, Berlin, Germany and Miami, Florida, with one more place left: Melbourne, Australia. We had the chance to meet and talk with some of the leading art professionals, curators and gallerists of these cities, and each of them shared their own experiences and tips on where to see the best of art. We were also thinking: if you travel somewhere, you need a place to stay, right? And so, we put together the lists of the best art hotels on the West Coast, New York City, the Mediterranean and Germany, as well as those overlooking the sea, everywhere. Little bit more focused on street art and urban art, we gave an insight on the best street art destinations worldwide and, specifically, in South America, where the entire cities represent one big canvas of creativity.

Before you step into the long, hot summer, take one more look at the eventful June by scrolling down.

  • Widewalls Editors Pick

Art Basel in Basel 2015 - Always a Top Pick

Art Basel in Basel is, without any doubt, one of the most important art fairs in the world. This art fair is also an event that every art collector has to have in mind – some of the most renowned galleries, curators, artists, dealers and collectors are attending. During these four days of Art Basel, the city of Basel becomes a global center of contemporary art. And this year nothing has changed – Art Basel in Basel 2015 will gather 284 leading international galleries, from 33 countries, that will present works ranging from the Modern period of the early 20th century to the most contemporary artists of today. This is 46th edition of Art Basel taking place in Basel, Switzerland (apart from Basel, Art Basel also takes place at Hong Kong and Miami. Art Basel in Basel 2015 has an absolutely amazing program. The number of participating galleries and artists is huge, while the list of art market actors that will be present in Basel is simply astonishing.

See what the biggest art fair in the world had to offer here.

  • Widewalls Editors Pick

An Interview with Dominique Lévy

Dominique Lévy is one of the most influencing women in the world of art – and all that at the age of just 48. Lévy, a gallerist, advisor, and collector, founded Dominique Lévy Gallery in January 2013. She has founded the Private Sales department at Christie’s, was its International Director from 1999 to 2003, and in 2005, Lévy co-founded L&M Arts in New York and Los Angeles. Today, Dominique Lévy Gallery has its offices in New York, London, and Geneva, and it is specialized in twentieth-century European and American art, with a program that explores global tendencies in modern and contemporary art through curated exhibitions, original scholarship, and new publications. Dominique Lévy Gallery participates in all three Art Basel fairs, and at the upcoming 46th edition of Art Basel it will be presented at Booth G14. At third Art Basel fair, which will take place in Basel, Switzerland on June 18 – 21, gallery will present a curated stand on the theme of grisaille, exploring achromaticity throughout post-war and contemporary art, and especially highlighting artists for whom grey was at the apotheosis of their practice, such as Alexander Calder, Alberto Giacometti, Pablo Picasso, Robert Ryman, Frank Stella, Günther Uecker and Christopher Wool, among others.

Read our interesting chat by clicking here.

  • Widewalls Editors Pick
  • Widewalls Editors Pick

Detroit Art Travel Special: Podcast with Jesse Cory and Dan Armand

Jesse Cory and Dan Armand are creators of Inner State Gallery as well as an intriguing phenomenon which has become globally recognized under the label 1xRUN. The most important thing I have learned through an exciting dialogue is reflected in the realization that one does not travel somewhere in order to acquaint oneself with a certain space. Rather, one becomes aware of a cultural space only through the energy of a community of its creative inhabitants… For this realization I am thankful to Jesse and Dan.

During this special edition of Widewalls Podcast dedicated to Detroit Art Travel, serving as voices of the Street Art culture and witnesses of the transformation of Detroit’s art scene, Jesse and Dan have given us an insight into some of the most exciting and must-see places in Detroit. Along the way, you will be able to get to know them better, because – what is now apparently clear – art travel is about knowing the people and only through a community, understanding a cultural space…

Hear them talk in here.

  • Widewalls Editors Pick
  • Widewalls Editors Pick

What are 10 Best Cities for Street Art?

Cultural tourism is a concept that has been around for centuries. Starting with the pilgrimage in the Middle Ages and travels to Santiago de Compostela, Rome and Jerusalem which brought, besides the spiritual redemption, a cultural exchange. Later, during the Renaissance, the idea was a bit modified, leaving out the faith as a primary drive conceding it to the cultural upgrade of the artist partaking on the adventure of getting familiarized with what was going on beyond the walls of their hometowns. Today, the cultural tourism is on a whole different level and the cultural offerings of big cities all over the world are one of the most appealing attractions for potential tourists. For example, it is not a strange occurrence to see the network of museums in Paris protesting against the decision of Louis Vuitton Foundation to open a private museum in a building projected by a superstar architect Frank Gehry, and by doing so, taking a piece of profit that once belonged to the state-run museums. On the other hand, ha have seen an emerging trend in cultural tourism which includes the pilgrimage to the holy sights of street art, following the places of its origin and development, and searching for particular street art pieces of some of the most famous street artists. In our today’s top 10 list, we will include some of the most appealing cities in the world for this kind of pilgrimage, because the real love of street art knows no boundaries.

Check them all out by clicking here.

  • Widewalls Editors Pick

Vernon Fisher Gets A Retrospective

The art of American artist Vernon Fisher is somehow always being linked with postmodernism. This classification is not a mistake, since so many elements of the work by this extraordinary artist are indeed postmodern. However, words postmodern and postmodernism have become a bit unclear when we speak about contemporary art (both modern and postmodern contemporary art). What does postmodernism mean after all? If we live in a postmodern world, isn’t contemporary art inherently postmodern? To make things even more confusing, sometimes postmodernism is automatically linked with conceptual art movement, which is not exactly correct. But, when we place “postmodern art” in an accurate context (temporal and spatial context), then we can easily label a body of art as postmodern. American artist Vernon Fisher, whose career began in the mid-1970s, is one of the artists who can easily be linked to the group of art movements that pushed the boundaries of postmodernism, since his most notable works were created precisely in the era when the modern/postmodern dichotomy had more sense (take a look at our list of artists that are linked with postmodern art). Mark Moore Gallery from Culver City organizes a retrospective of works by Fisher, which will be a great opportunity for art enthusiasts to enjoy in real “postmodern” art. The exhibition is curated by Hugh Davies of the Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego.

Read more about the exhibition here.

  • Widewalls Editors Pick
  • Widewalls Editors Pick

Japanese Erotic Art, A Brief History

For almost three full decades of the Edo period, between the 17th and the 19th century, when the economy grew and the people enjoyed arts and culture to the fullest, the Japanese culture has seen the bloom of Shunga. A form of the traditional erotic art, it is a type of ukiyo-e, a genre of woodblock prints and paintings, with a literal meaning of “picture of spring”, introducing the name of the season as a euphemism for sex. Highly explicit, shunga celebrated all facets of human sexuality and desire: heterosexual, homosexual, transsexual, and depicted a dazzling spectrum of practices and expressions such as voyeurism in the most raw and exaggerated way. In these artworks, the subjects are seen luring in ecstasy and sexual excitement, in a scenery that leaves nothing to imagination. That shunga were so widely popular shows the fact that respected artists like Kitagawa Utamaro, and especially Katsushika Hokusai, also created them at one point of their career. Hokusai, who is famous for his 1830 iconic painting The Great Wave off Kanagawa, made another historical work as shunga: The Dream of the Fisherman’s Wife, in 1814.

Continue reading by clicking here.

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