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Emerging to Established II

  • Krause Gallery
June 21, 2014
Ana Bambic Kostov is an art historian with passion for contemporary art.

Summer Group Show organized by the New York based Krause Gallery every year will be presented to the public in a slightly different manner this year. Entitled Emerging to Established Part 2, the exhibition will showcase new pieces created by the established artists represented by the gallery as well as a lineup of emerging creatives. This will be the second edition of the Emerging to Established exhibition, currently on view at the Krause Gallery, showing an array of some of the most standout urban artists of the scene.The second part of the show will open on July 2 and it will run through the month, closing on July 30, 2014.

Krause Gallery
Matt Bilfield

New group of artists

Creativity on every level is strongly encouraged by the gallery, in expectancy to get insightful new work by the selected creatives. Media is not limited to one, as is not the pool from which the exhibiting artists are selected, making the Krause Gallery show an interesting reflection of the international new contemporary art scene. From urban art to pop art, expressions vary as well, including gooey cheerful monsters of Buff Monster and the three-dimensional paintings of distinctive sculptural quality created by Matt Bilfields. The opening night reception will include a giveaway of 20 prints by Lambros, at the gallery’s discretion. Differing from the roster of part 1 of the Emerging to Established exhibition, the second lineup includes Matt Bilfield, Peter Gronquist, Buff Monster, Indie 184, Ian Sklarsky, Gregoire Guillemin, Nathan Vincent, Lambros, Don’t Fret, Leon Reid, Noah Scalin, ME, and Notre Chauvet.

Krause Gallery
Notre Chauvet

Snapshot of the Contemporary Scene #2

Matt Bilfield is known for his works that are hard to define. They are sculptural paintings, or wall sculptures, installation pieces or three-dimensional pictures, all created on the trail of Lichtenstein’s pop art, while rendering current, reduced topics through female close-up portraiture. Peter Gronquist borrows much more than his visual identity font from the Disney concept. His works are colorful, ironic renderings of beloved icons, representative of the new pop. Buff Monster we all know and love for the amorphous creatures. Indie 84 makes bollywood-ish collages of contemporary pop icons merged with graffiti. Ian Sklarsky is the maker of wonderful linear, but vivid drawings, while Gregoire Guillemin has a graphic, polished style delving into the urban art realm. Nathan Vincent creates conceptual spatial installations or object that question our notion of the everyday feelings and norms. Lambros, whose prints will be presented to a selected few at the opening, renders faces of the rich and famous, as well as the best known scenes from cult movies. Don?t Fret has a delightfully comical drawing style, while Leon Reid is much less entertaining, as he addresses current problems of violence and paranoia through his outdoor urban installations. Noah Scalin makes phenomenal portraits of the important figures of history and today, using small objects such as cogs, rose petals, dice and similar tiny components. Notre Chauvet creates fantastic works with overlapping planes coming from different styles, bearing complementary, but different meaning.

Krause Gallery
Call ME

This group of artists represents the diversity of the current art scene, but also the one thread which connects them all, and that is a clear attitude toward the phenomenon of the celebrity and human icon.