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STeW at NUNC

  • STeW at NUNC
October 23, 2014
Bojan Marić was born in 1986. He had studied at the University of Belgrade – Faculty of Political Sciences (Department for International Studies and Department for Cultural Studies). He is a teaching assistant on the courses Cultural Studies and Culture and Social Structure. He takes part in activities within the Center for Cultural Studies in Belgrade, such as project management, organization of cultural events and academic conferences. Currently, he is working on his Master thesis within the field of Philosophy of Culture. His favourite urban artists are Vhils, Saber, My Dog Sighs and MadC. Contact Bojan Maric via bojan.maric@widewalls.ch

When talking about sources of inspiration, there is so much to choose from when it comes to street art. The “meeting” of diverse cultures and globalized societies, whether on the platforms of the digital world, or through collaboration in the urban space, renders street art to be one of the most inclusive movements in contemporary societies. The possibilities of articulating popular culture elements with historic forms of expression only ameliorates the inclusive dimension if urban and street art. This is something that the public can experience in the upcoming exhibition by the French artist STeW…

STeW at NUNC
STeW, artwork

Power of Samurai Culture

The samurai culture is one of the most intriguing and interesting phenomena in the world. The power of this ruling class, called bushi, spanned over the time between the 9th century and the period of modernization, ten centuries later. The class of warriors was known for following The Way of the Warrior, or bushido. A great influence of philosophical and religious connotations became the part of the samurai doctrine through Zen Buddhism, shaping standards of conduct and, most notably, overcoming the notion of the fear of death. The era of samurai ended with Emperor Meiji, when the Japanese government decided to shape the army forces in the form of Western societies. Apart from the warrior culture, perhaps the greatest heritage of the samurai was reflected in their status as scholars and “keepers” of knowledge and culture. Today, they emerge once again through the creative process of street artist STeW…

STeW at NUNC
STeW, artwork

The Art of STeW

Street artist STeW lives and works in the city of Vitry, France. After the exile from his native France, he went to Brussels, where he had studied Art and Design. Through his artwork, STeW depicts the imagery of the heroic samurai, embedding his art pieces in urban contexts. The relation between the street art culture and symbolism of the culture he admires, the artist had explored in this year’s exhibition Welcome on Bird (to learn more about this, read our article The Modern Samurai). Not only does the artist articulate the samurai concept with the nature of street art, but the entire imagery of other symbols constitutes an homage to the ancient Japanese culture. During the summer, confirming the good-hearted nature of street art endeavors, STeW participated in a street art project in Djerba, Tunisia (to find out more, read our article Djerbahood). This November, his artwork is coming to Paris…

STeW at NUNC
STeW, artwork

Exhibition at NUNC!

STeW is known to add a personal touch when creating the representations of Japanese warriors by integrating samurai symbolism with contemporary elements. These ancient, yet entirely postmodern characters, reside in the context filled with strange imagery – skulls dance in the background, they wear spike studded bracelets coil around wrists and have tattoos… The mighty katana is replaced with a powerful weapon of symbolic resistance – a spray can! In the period between November 6th and November 27th 2014, at NUNC! Gallery, witness this ancient-modern hybrids from the hands of STeW…

STeW at NUNC
STeW, artwork
STeW at NUNC
STeW, artwork

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