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Must-See Gallery Section Booths at Berliner Liste 2016

  • Kalashnikovv Gallery
  • Apollo Art Gallery 1
  • Cell63
  • Mario Bremel _ 24 Beaubourg 1
  • Die Schroeder Galerie
September 16, 2016
Ana Bambic Kostov is an art historian with passion for contemporary art.

With three curated sections and special features in the form of Japanese Young Artists Group and Master Kang’s sculptures, Berliner Liste confirms its position as the largest art fair in the city with the most diverse offer for collectors. Big portion of the fair’s focus this year went to young artists, but also young(er) galleries and their fresh rosters. We went through the Gallery Section of the Berliner Liste and selected gallery section booths that are not to be missed at the 2016 edition of Berlin’s oldest art fair.

Pine Wood Fine Art, Werder|Havel

Talking to Leonie Helling, the person behind the Pine Wood Fine Art gallery, we’ve learned more about the philosophy of contemporary landscape that goes beyond the aesthetics. Start the tour at booth G0.03.

  • Galerie Hofkabinett
  • Galerie Hofkabinett 1

Galerie Hofkabinett, Linz

Poignant compositions by Ekaterina Fischnaller and tactile pieces of Markus Miksch take up the space of the booth belonging to Austrian Galerie Hofkabinett. Hosting some of our favorites at the fair, the booth is marked G0.09.

  • Die Schroeder Galerie
  • Die Schroeder Galerie 1

Die Schroeder Galerie, Berlin

Giving a new vision of textile art and with a display of a very different take on Mondrian, Die Schroeder Galerie steals attention. Object-painting signed as Mondrian VS Edel toys with the aesthetic and conceptual notions of De Stijl. See all the objects at booth G0.30.

  • Mario Bremel _ 24 Beaubourg
  • Mario Bremel _ 24 Beaubourg 2
  • Mario Bremel _ 24 Beaubourg 1

Mario Bremel and 24 Beaubourg, Berlin

We finish with a painterly delight found at Mario Bremel & 24 Beaubourg. The semi-abstracted compositions by Barbara Navi are in essence representational, but they possess a certain impressionistic quality. Cold and warm contrasts of Nur Dunn’s work provide a design-like visual impact, but the decorative nature of the pieces does not cloud their contemplative essence. Our tour ends at the booth number G0.26.

All images (c) Widewalls.