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Trip the Light

  • Trip the Light
August 24, 2014
Sanja Lazic was born in 1990 in Belgrade, Serbia. Her interest in art comes from a very early age and although she didn’t have the talent to pursue it professionally, she enjoys every day working and writing about it. Her favorite urban artists are Interesni Kazki, Saner and Phlegm.

Born and raised in Melbourne, the Australian artist James Reka aka Reka One grew up surrounded by dance. His mother was a professional ballerina who used to dance with the Russian ballet. This was the picture that stuck in his memory and influences his later work and served as a big inspiration for the artist. The back alley German discothéques he now calls home could not be further from his upbringing in either geography or style, yet this fusion of elegance and grit is what draws audiences so passionately to his work. The Berlin based artist started exploring the splendor of the female form in dance, and with his deft brushstrokes and fluid lines created a hypnotic dynamic movement that prances between his canvases. He is considered a pioneer of a new style of street art – surrealist, abstracted creatures emerging from the depths of Reka’s mind, communicating through strong lines, dynamic movement and bold colours. His fresh style and interesting works brought him great recognition in the art world and led to numerous exhibitions in galleries all over the world.  

Trip the Light
James Reka

Dance As An Inspiration

With influences in pop culture, cartoons and illustration, Reka’s style was instantly respected within the community. This September, the artist will have his first London exhibition called ‘Trip the Light’. First referenced in John Milton’s 1645 poem L’Allegro, to “trip the light fantastic” alludes to those who dance without inhibition. All came into place for the artists and he created female forms that writhe with delight, moving to a silent rhythm from influences as diverse as Spanish flamenco guitars to the grimy clubs of Berlin’s inner East.

Trip the Light
James Reka

Tradition Of the Street In the Contemporary World

Using a multi-medium background that mimics the textured surfaces he paints on in the streets, Reka’s clean lines and figures make us focus on them the same way we focus to a dancer in a crowded room. A series of painted found objects accompany these 10 large canvases – Reka has become known for his series of repurposed readymades. These rusted spray cans, bottles, pans and other miscellany are often found on his many scavenges around Berlin’s abandoned warehouses. By taking the tools of the artists before him and repurposing them into new works of art, he is carrying the tradition of the street in the contemporary world.

Trip the Light
James Reka

Trip the Light

His work has recently been exhibited in Stroke NYC, Melbourne and Denmark, and he has partaken in festivals from Montreal to Hawaii. Reka’s work appears on walls and private collections in Tokyo, San Francisco and Paris, including in The National Gallery Of Australia’s permanent collection. And on September 11, running through October 4th, Reka’s works will be on display in London Stolen Space Gallery for the first time as a part of the ‘Trip the Light’ exhibiton. Don’t miss it!

Trip the Light
James Reka

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