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  • Joshua Liner Gallery
  • Joshua Liner Gallery
  • Joshua Liner Gallery
  • Joshua Liner Gallery

The Intense Afterimage

March 12, 2014
Asja Nastasijevic is an Art Historian with the major in Modern Art. She's involved in art writing and criticism for several years now. Art is her passion and writing about it is both work and pleasure. Among modern art movements she loves Fauvism, Abstract Expressionism, and POP ART and her favorite artists are Henri Matisse, Mark Rothko and Andy Warhol. She fell in love with Street Art when she first saw ROA’s Sleepy Pigs in Brussels few years ago. Since then, she devotedly explores this form of artistic expression. She hates when someone asks her whether the street art is a real art. What makes any art a real art? Art is an evolutionary act with constant changes in its performance. In Asja’s opinion, the real art is what you want to hang on the walls of your living room, as simple as that. So she wants to hang the works of Ron English, Gaia and ROA above her TV cabinet or to place the artworks of Mark Jenkins and Isaac Cordal next to her sofa. She enjoys bowling and doodling.

Palinopsia, an exhibition of large-scale works from Berlin-based artist Julie Oppermann is currently on view at Joshua Liner Gallery in NYC. It is Julie Oppermann’s New York City debut solo show. The title of the exhibition, Palinopsia is a visual phenomenon, which occurs when the image of an object seems to linger in the eyes even after the original object is absent—much like when looking directly into a light source, then looking away. However, Palinopsia is a much stronger visual occurrence, the afterimage more intense and lasting much longer. These after images start to set in within a few seconds, and get stronger the longer we look.  The artist’s background in neuroscience and study of color theory both support and stimulate the nature of the work she creates.

Joshua Liner Gallery
Julie Oppermann Triptych

Visual Perception

The first thing you need to know about Julia is that she is an artist and scholar of science. Julie Oppermann holds a BFA and an MFA in painting, as well as a BA in biology and MA in neuroscience. Now everything will be much clearer in understanding her art. Julie Oppermann’s work pushes the limits of visual perception, making paintings that are physically difficult to perceive. Oppermann’s work deals with how the brain perceives information, how it processes what the viewer sees. In other words, the perception itself is her medium.

Joshua Liner Gallery
Julie Oppermann – Palinopsia

Interference, Optical Flicker and Digital Glitches

In 2008, while pursuing a master’s degree in neuroscience at UC Berkley, Oppermann came across the moiré effect after superimposing line patterns over one another. However, it is just one element in Oppermann’s work. The artist says, “In the last few years I’ve become increasingly interested in ideas related to interference, optical flicker, and digital glitches, and while the moiré effect is still prominent in my work, it is moving to the back burner.”

Joshua Liner Gallery
Julie Oppermann – Palinopsia

Improvised Lines

Though dealing in more contemporary materials and methods, these large-scale canvases tend to be quite painterly in their process. Coats of lines are all improvised. There’s no measuring or rulers involved. Those develop spontaneously while she works. Oppermann uses a lot of skinny tape to mask out the line patterns. She tapes, then paints, and then takes the tape off, and repeats everything with the next layer. She sometimes uses a computer to work out color systems.

Joshua Liner Gallery
Julie Oppermann – Palinopsia

Pulsating

Oppermann’s paintings are created with the purpose of having the viewer actively engage with the artwork. She aims at the physical response to her work.  Her paintings challenge the observers view. The scale of the work is purposeful in the intent to overwhelm the viewer, usurping the peripheral vision. Oppermann’s paintings are alive; they pulsate. The scintillating effects arising through the calculated layering and juxtaposition of contrasting colors through repetitive line patterns elicit shuttering afterimages, optical flicker, and disorienting sensations of movement.