Street Update #187

May 1, 2020

As the deadly strain of the coronavirus, also known as COVID-19, continues to spread across the world, many are wondering how will our world look like after the pandemic is over. Although it seems that the world is standing still, street artists remain active in a myriad of ways. Some have decided to take to the streets to reflect the difficult situation the world is facing, while others continue to create art under lockdown in their homes. Here are the best pieces from around the world; in the meantime, be sure to follow us on Instagram to always stay up to date.

Fintan Magee in Dubbo

The renowned Australian street artist Fintan Magee collaborated with Diane Mcnaboe and Lewis Burns to create a massive mural on the exterior of Dubbo base hospital. A portrait of three generations of a Wiradjuri family, Meeting Point explores the role of storytelling and dance in the sharing of cultural knowledge between generations and the importance of family structures in cultural preservation and identity.

 

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Ana Barriga in Barcelona

In her work, Ana Barriga uses humor, play and irony to allow unpredictable situations. On the occasion of the closing of TAPIA collective show in at B-Murals in Barcelona, the artist painted a new wall at La Sagrera’s Espacio30. Depicting two ceramic figures executed in the trash-pop style, the work is inspired by some of the objects that the artist looks for in popular flea markets such as Madrid’s El Rastro. For this work, the artist used different techniques such as oil painting, varnish and spray cans.

 

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Pejac at Home

Pejac, known for combining elements of surrealism and fantasy in his signature minimalist style works, has launched a StayArtHomePejac campaign, inviting the public to explore their creativity while in lockdown. As a way of going through lockdown in Madrid, Pejac recently revived his old concept of miniature window drawings interacting with the life outside. The public is invited to grab their pens, brushes, papers, and scissors, and join him in building a monumental opus of urban art from home.

 

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AkaCorleone in Lisbon

A Portuguese illustrator, graphic designer and visual artist, AkaCorleone is known for his dexterity in using colors, typography, characters and forms. The artist participated in the SEAT Art Cities project in Lisbon, curated by his fellow street artist Vhils. Titled Look Up, the mural explores our connection with social media that can become obsessive. As the artist explained, we are often glued to our screens while the world continues to spin, without realizing everything that we are missing.

 

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Levalet

The French artist Levalet is best known for his monochromatic wheat paste-up images of people, which interact with their environments in interesting and wonderful ways. Combining humor and absurdity to create a new vision of urban poetry, he mixes the world of representation with the real, placing great importance on the illusion effect. The artist recently created a new piece titled Le ville endormie, depicting a figure sleeping on top of the skyline of the city.

 

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Banksy at Home

The most famous anonymous street artist Banksy is under the lockdown as the majority of the world, but this is not stopping him from working. Posting a few images of a work executed presumably in his home bathroom, the artist wrote: "My wife hates it when I work from home." The work features a mischievous pack of his signature rats destroying everything in sight: swinging from towel racks, running on the precious toilet paper, marking the days of quarantine on the wall, and making a disgusting mess of the toilet.

 

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David de la Mano in Montevideo

Through his highly unique minimalist monochromatic murals, the Spanish artist David de la Mano explores every corner of social behavior. His anthropomorphic silhouettes of individuals and masses serve as a symbolic reflection of the humankind and the human perception of the world. The artist recently created a small piece on the roof of a building in Montevideo as part of a project celebrating the 50th anniversary of Earth Day and other environmental issues.

 

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JR in New York

Merging together photography and street art, JR creates works charged with emotion and heavy social issues, carrying messages between groups of people. While in New York, the artist created a portrait of famous ballerina Charlotte Ranson on the wall of an East Village tenement. Titled CONFINED II, the work depicts Ranson contorted into a small space, reflecting what we all feel under the coronavirus quarantine.

 

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Saype in Leysin

The French artist Saype is best known for a series of giant biodegradable artworks which adorn fields, best seen by drones. The artist created another monumental work in Leysin, Switzerland. Titled Beyond Crisis, this 3000 m2 land art painting aims to send a message of hope and positivity to the world in the difficult times of the COVID-19 pandemic. As the rest of his works, it is created with biodegradable paints made from natural pigments such as coal and chalk.

 

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Featured image: Saype - Beyond Crisis. Courtesy the artist.

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