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  • Wabash Lights Beta 2017

Matthew Rachman Gallery Hosts The Opening of the Largest Piece of Public Art in Chicago!

March 1, 2017
Smirna Kulenović is an Art History and Philosophy graduate, developing video and sound art projects, in love with improvisational theater and performance. Runs away into deserts, forests and waterfalls.

The opening of the largest piece of public art to be created in Chicago, a beta version of the interactive light art sculpture called The Wabash Lights, will be held soon at Matthew Rachman Gallery! The complete artwork will be placed underside of the Wabash Avenue elevated train tracks in Chicago’s loop, and aims at transforming this important piece of Chicago infrastructure into an interactive playground that bursts with life and dynamism. It will completely change the interaction of citizens with the public space in Wabash Avenue, and the entire city. This is an initiative conducted by two co-creators and artists who made the art concept, managed to collect the initial funding and established the advisory board of Chicago influencers − Jack C. Newell and Seth Unger.

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Jack C Newell, Seth Unger – The Wabash Lights Rendering 01, 2017

Art and Commons: Street, Alley, Park or Bridge as a Gallery

This light art sculpture will not only serve as an interactive platform, but should broaden the horizon of commons inside both Wabash Avenue and entire Chicago. Firstly, it will create a safer surrounding in the downtown area, by lighting up this important connection between Millennium Park, Theater District, and the Riverwalk. Also, it should serve as an intermediary point for Chicago and it’s citizens, and could lead to a more unified feeling, which creates a perfect platform for a more successful community building. On the other side, it could also boost the economy of the city and Wabash neighborhood, by attracting tourists and inspiring new businesses to be opened in this area. Lastly, the whole reputation of Chicago as a city, positioned in the global public art scene will be drastically improved.

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Jack C. Newell, Seth Unger – The Wabash Lights Rendering 02, 2017

From a Dream to Realization

The co-creators of the initiative, Jack C. Newell and Seth Unger, didn’t just imagine the concept of this artwork, but worked hard to gather the permissions and initial funds for it’s beta version and demo prototypes realization, trough a successful campaign on Kickstarter. Jack C. Newell is a successful and award winning filmmaker, commercial director, and public art enthusiast, while Seth Unger works as a design and creative strategist, new media expert, and brand consultant. The first part of the work that they have accomplished consisted of making twelve feet of light which they used to troubleshoot design and technical challenges. They will go trough many different testing phases until the entire fundraising for Chicago’s largest public sculpture, made out of 600 lights, is completed.

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Jack C. Newell, Seth Unger –  The Wabash Lights Beta Version, 2017

Experience The Exclusive Prototypes of the Largest Public Art Piece in Chicago

The opening night will showcase several demo prototypes presenting the interactivity of the light, and place the viewer in the middle of the largest piece of public art in Chicago. It will be held on March 2, 2017, 6:30 PM – 9:00 PM at Matthew Rachman GalleryBesides the demonstration of the prototypes creted by the desire to educate the viewers, there will also be a short update on the current status of the work, and a Q/A session with the artwork’s co-creators Jack Newell and Seth Unger. Be amongst the first to be immersed in this extraordinary light installation!

Featured image: Jack C Newell, Seth Unger  – The Wabash Lights Beta Version, 2017. All Images are Courtesy of the Wabash Lights.