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Sculptures You Can Own Today!

  • Romain Langlois - Echos, 2014
April 11, 2018
A philosophy graduate interested in theory, politics and art. Alias of Jelena Martinović.

Art is a constantly evolving continuum and a reflection of the times in which it is created. Through the practice of modern and contemporary sculptors, the three-dimensional art form has certainly come a long way since the marble busts and butts of yore. Throughout the 21st century, sculpture artists reconsidered, redefined and reworked the very concept of the sculpture in a more profound way than it had ever been before.

In contemporary art, sculpture has myriad of manifestations, becoming far more than the physical thing itself. It exists in and defines not just physical space, but psychic space, conceptual space, political space, but also our presence in it, our relationship to it, our movement through it, our responsibility for it.

We present you 10 pieces of contemporary sculpture created by artists where each has a different vision of what sculpture can be, and each would be a valuable addition to your art collection!

Featured image: Romain Langlois – Echos, 2014. All images courtesy of their respective gallery.

  • Jeff Koons - Balloon Dog (Yellow), 2015

Jeff Koons - Balloon Dog (Yellow), 2015

Often described as a king of postmodernism, Jeff Koons is one of the most influential and controversial artists of the post-war era. Working somewhere in between high and low culture, he often creates work that plays with kitsch. Through his practice, he has managed to transform the notion of an artist to the cult of celebrity in the global market.

The piece Ballon Dog (Yellow) from 2015 is part of a limited edition series that references his iconic, monumental sculpture of the same name from his highly acclaimed Celebration series. Referring to milestones in the cycle of life, the Celebration series evokes both the simple delight and complex nostalgia of holidays and birthdays. This small-scale version is created out of a high-quality porcelain. The piece is described by Koons as “a Trojan horse to the whole body of art work”.

See more info about the work here.

  • Robert Rauschenberg - Publicon Station V, 1978

Robert Rauschenberg - Publicon Station V, 1978

One of the central figures in the development of post-war American art, Robert Rauschenberg created works that bridge the gap between Abstract Expressionism to later modern movements. Through an innovative approach, he expanded the former boundaries to open the possibilities of experimentation for further artists.

The work Publicon Station V from 1978 is part of the series Publicons comprised of 30 sculptures. Works from the series are cabinets, each of which opens to reveal an enshrined object. The title itself merges “icon”, referencing medieval reliquaries and Renaissance altarpieces, and “public”, since pieces could be manipulated by the viewer.

See more info about the work here.

  • Maurizio Cattelan - Love Cement Sculpture

Maurizio Cattelan - L.O.V.E. Cement Sculpture

Imbued with a blend of dark humor and chilling realism, the satirical sculptures of the Italian artist Maurizio Cattelan are known to both amuse and horrify the viewers. Finding inspiration in the notions of Dadaism and Surrealism, he frequently depicts celebrities, political individuals, figures from art history and animals in comically absurd scenes with deeper meanings.

This piece is a 1:28 reproduction of L.O.V.E. sculpture installed in 2010 in Piazza Affari in Milan. One of his most discussed sculptures, it features a gesture with a certain sarcastic stance. The title of the original sculpture is an acronym of libertà (freedom), odio (hate), vendetta (revenge), and eternità (eternity), but it is popularly known as The Middle Finger.

See more info about the work here.

  • Arman - Inclusion de violon decoupe

Arman - Inclusion de violon decoupe

A French-born American artist, Arman was one of the co-founders of the Nouveau réalisme movement, a French reaction to Pop Art. Known for his bold and visionary projects, he delivered a powerful and chilling rejection of modernization and the culture of mass consumption. In his later career, he developed an aesthetic based on the act of destruction.

Arman’s Violins are his most recognizable body of work. These works featured sliced, burned, or smashed violins arranged on canvas, demonstrating his exploration of creation via destruction.

See more info about the work here.

  • Mono Cieza - Guardian observer - Conejo con kabuto

Mono Cieza - Guardian observer - Conejo con kabuto

An Argentinien contemporary artist, Mono Cieza is mostly known for his unusual and fantastical creatures which are expressed through sculpture and paintings. Intrigued by the limited human physicality, the artist constructs and shapes hybrid bodies which resemble the ancient pagan traditions which saw the concept of the body from more spiritual perspective.

The work is part of the series Guardian Observers. Created out of polychromatic epoxy in acrylic, it represents a surreal warrior figure.

See more info about the work here.

  • Romain Langlois - Echos, 2014

Romain Langlois - Echos, 2014

A French contemporary artist, Romain Langlois creates sculptures which question our perception of both what we see and what we know. Finding his inspiration in the world around us, he creates stretched sculptures that visually pull apart natural objects. Using bronze for its perenniality and the vibrational quality, he aims to dissect these natural elements, representing the inner energy harnessed by his chosen materials.

In the work Echos from 2014 Langlois very realistically imitates the aspect of rock. Denaturing this somewhat banal object, the artist gave it an appearance of value and a liquid and stretched outlook. At the same time, the work intrigues us and transforms our impression of it.

See more info about the work here.

  • Markus Genesius - Inner Conflict

Markus Genesius - Inner Conflict

A renowned German graffiti artist, Markus Genesius aka WOW123 combines figurative motifs and classical writing in his work. He has been developing an iconography of the TV test pattern, creating complex compositions with graphic structures and polygonal shapes.

For his 2016 solo exhibition Inner Conflict in Bremen, the artist produced this large wood sculpture which takes the test picture into the three-dimensional room.

See more info about the work here.

  • Fidia Falaschetti - Meanie Mouse (gold)

Fidia Falaschetti - Meanie Mouse (gold)

Exploring the relationship between digital and analog, the Italian artist Fidia Falashetti creates a wide range of multi-media pieces. Some of the concepts artist explores are commercialism, consumerism, pop culture and the globalization of mainstream media. Through his practice, he has created a surrealistic society made up of bizarre iconic characters who are shown in different contexts.

The work Meanie Mouse (gold) is a part of series of works that also includes versions in multi-chrome, multi-color, dark onyx and pink. The work is based on Disney’s Minnie Mouse.

See more info about the work here.

  • Tanis Saxby - Intimacy1, 2016

Tanis Saxby - Intimacy 1, 2016

The Canadian artist Tanis Saxby creates sculptures that are a lyrical version of the objects around her. She is intrigued by often overlooked objects such as dandelion seeds, bones and decaying flowers. Developing a personal relationship to the materiality of the work, she uses the form as a way to communicate and connect with the viewer. Often carrying relational and erotic associations, her pieces suggest a female body rather than represent it.

The beautiful, minimalist sculpture Intimacy 1 from 2016 is created out of white porcelain. Although quite tall, the piece is made to look airy and fragile.

See more info about the work here.

  • Maximilian Pruefer - Flechten

Maximilian Pruefer - Flechten

Fascinated by the complexity of nature, the German artist Maximilian Prüefer is trying to make visible every little thing that misses human eye. Conceptually examining the natural processes and phenomena, he turns almost every movement into a picture, making the record of it with his own printing system, the so-called Naturantypie. This process involves a highly sensitive printer that creates the smallest contact with the surface, letting out the ink and recording every movement.

The work Flechten depicts a Biedermeier Jesus, gilded with gold leaf. The work is placed in a glass drop, gold-plated with gold leaves.

See more info about the work here.