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All the Smiths Come to Marlborough London

  • Meryl Smith - The Pierrot Equus (detail), 2019
  • Emily Mae Smith - Wheels of Fortune, 2018
  • Cauleen Smith - Leave me for the Crows, 2016
July 3, 2019
A philosophy graduate interested in critical theory, politics and art. Alias of Jelena Martinović.

Originating from England, the surname Smith is the most prevalent surname in the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the United States. While dominant among those of English, Scottish and Irish descent, it is also a common surname among African Americans, which can be attributed to the era of slavery. Being such a frequent name in English-speaking countries, people there often adopt the surname in order to avoid being found.

After a stimulating and amusing conversation with Maurizio Cattelan, Marlborough Fine Art will present an exhibition which will bring together over 30 artists with the surname Smith, both established and emerging. Simply titled The Smiths, it will span multiple generations, styles and media.

Michael Smith - A Hearty Toast, 2015, Sable Elyse Smith - maps for a body thirsty for some other shit, 2018
Left: Michael Smith – A Hearty Toast, 2015. Watercolor on paper, (12 x 9 in, 30.5 x 22.9 cm). Courtesy of The Artist and Greene Naftali / Right: Sable Elyse Smith – maps for a body thirsty for some other shit, 2018. Collage on vellum, 12 x 9 in, (30.5 x 22.9 cm). Courtesy of The Artist and JTT Gallery

Unexpected Connections and Dialogues

Presenting the self-selected works, the exhibition will create connections and dialogues between unexpected artists and artworks. This will certainly bring a fortuitous dynamism to the display.

The audience will have an opportunity to see a stately ink drawing by the legendary David Smith alongside a small oil canvas by a painter Emily Mae Smith as well the work by the young self-taught Philadelphia sculptor Kambel Smith. In this way, the display forces un-premeditated connections and multivalent conversations, which wouldn’t normally happen in a conventional exhibition setting.

John Smith - Om, 1986
John Smith – Om, 1986. 16mm transferred to HD video, colour, sound, 4 minutes. Courtesy of The Artist and Kate MacGarry, London.

Participating Artists

The show will bring together artists from both sides of the Atlantic, further adding a layer of multihyphenate cultural figures to the mix, who may be either exalted or democratized by the process.

The audience will have an opportunity to see Greg Parma Smith‘s painted realism, perversely synthetic and immaculately crafted; works by a pioneer of sculpting with welded metal, David Smith; monochrome paintings by young and talented Joshua Smith; vivid and playfully amorphous paintings of Cary Smith; and minimalist works by a renown American sculptor, architectural designer, and a noted theorist on art, Tony Smith; among others.

Meryl Smith - The Pierrot Equus, 2019, Harry Smith - Tree of Life in the Four Worlds, 1997
Left: Meryl Smith – The Pierrot Equus, 2019. Oil on canvas, 25 3/4 x 19 3/4 in, (80.6 x 106.1 cm). Courtesy of The Artist / Right: Harry Smith – Tree of Life in the Four Worlds, 1997. Collotype on arches cover paper, 28 x 7 in, (71.1 x 17.8 cm). Courtesy Harry Smith Archive

The Smiths at Marlborough London

The exhibition The Smiths will be on view at Marlborough in London from July 3rd until August 2nd, 2019. The opening reception will take place on July 3rd, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Participating artists include Emily Mae Smith, Greg Parma Smith, Lucien Smith, Kambel Smith, Sir Paul Smith, David Smith, Joshua Smith, Patti Smith, Harry Smith, Cary Smith, Zak Smith, Adam Parker Smith, Michael Bell-Smith, Sable Elyse Smith, Matt Sheridan Smith, Meryl Smith, Clive Smith, Michael Smith, Barbara T. Smith, Michael E. Smith, Shinique Smith, Molly Smith, Cauleen Smith, Kiki Smith, Tony Smith, Bridget Smith, Bob and Roberta Smith, Anj Smith, Richard Smith, John Smith, Matthew Smith and more.

Featured image: Meryl Smith – The Pierrot Equus (detail), 2019; Emily Mae Smith – Wheels of Fortune, 2018. Oil on linen, 9 x 11 in. (22.9 x 27.9 cm). Courtesy of The Artist and Simone Subal Gallery; Cauleen Smith – Leave me for the Crows, 2016. Graphite, watercolor, gouache on paper, 12 1/2 x 14 7/8 in. (31.8 x 37.8 cm). Courtesy of The Artist and Kate Werble Gallery. All images courtesy of Marlborough London.